What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, spinach, baby arugula, baby bok choi, green curly kale, rainbow chard, parsley, zucchini, new red potatoes, new yellow potatoes, basil, loose red beets, yellow beets, garlic, onions, cabbage, kohlrabi, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, sweet peppers, jalapeno peppers, husk cherries, elderberries, leeks, acorn squash, mini butternut squash, spaghetti squash, and carrots!

our stand at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market, photo by Adam Ford

our stand at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market, photo by Adam Ford


Bulk Buying Opportunities!


Whenever we have plenty to offer bulk buying discounts, I let our CSA members and their friends and family know about veggies available if you do any preserving. If you are interested in any items when I list them, send me an email and I will get them packed up for you to pick up when you pick up your share. Bulk availability comes and goes, so if you are planning on doing preserving, don’t wait: they get spoken for quickly.This week we have:

  • jalapenos: $6 per pound or $20 for 4 pounds

  • parsley: $14 for 10 bunches or $22 for 20 bunches *pesto and chimichurri*

  • rainbow chard: $25 for 10 bunches or $40 for 20 bunches *we use this like spinach, freeze in small batches for winter quiches, omelettes, pasta dishes, etc*

  • sweet basil: $12 per pound *I make my basil pesto go farther by using half basil, half parsley. There will be a limited amount of basil available each week for bulk buying, so reserve your interest now, and I will confirm what week it will be ready*

  • heirloom tomatoes: $35 for 10 pounds

  • roma tomatoes: $30 for 10 pounds

  • elderberries: $60 for 10 pound bag of frozen berries (available fresh, not frozen upon request)

  • cabbage: $1.50/pound

  • carrots: $2/pound

  • red beets: $2/pound

  • garlic: $12 per pound we have both seed and table garlic available

fall beets and broccoli growing in the field, photo by Adam Ford

fall beets and broccoli growing in the field, photo by Adam Ford



CSA Details


You can pick up your share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn, check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler.  You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. You can pick up your share at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market on the Okemo Mountain School Lawn between 4 pm and 7 pm. Please do not come before 4 pm: The market has challenging neighbors and the entire market’s permit will be revoked if products leave the market before 4 pm.

delicious carmens! a favorite snack for both our kiddos. If you haven’t tried these red bull’s horn sweet peppers, you will love them, photo by Adam Ford

delicious carmens! a favorite snack for both our kiddos. If you haven’t tried these red bull’s horn sweet peppers, you will love them, photo by Adam Ford





Farm News

We started the big onion harvest this week, bringing in a little over half what we grew. We pull them when the tops have fallen over and then we spread them out on our tables in the propagation house to completely dry down. This year we will run them through an onion topper for the first time, and we are eager to see this new tool in action. We bought it used from another farm last winter, and we are hoping it saves a bunch of time cleaning up onions once the tops have dried up!

We have been enjoying a particular mama robin this year who built a nest and has raised two batches of babies right on our porch this year… we sit out on the porch and watch the eggs, then they hatch, then these cute little squeekers cheep like mad when we walk by as if we may have their meal, alas we don’t….. Adam caught the mama robin in flight here, photo by Adam Ford

We have been enjoying a particular mama robin this year who built a nest and has raised two batches of babies right on our porch this year… we sit out on the porch and watch the eggs, then they hatch, then these cute little squeekers cheep like mad when we walk by as if we may have their meal, alas we don’t….. Adam caught the mama robin in flight here, photo by Adam Ford

We transplanted out many more rows of fall lettuce, the last of the lettuce we will transplant outdoors.

The elderberry harvest was fasts and furious this year, spanning just over two weeks, but yielding well over 500 pounds of berries. We are selling another big batch to Long Trail Brewing for a seasonal elderberry sour ale they started last year, and another large amounts usually makes its way to Yoder Farm for their elderberry vinegar. We have been surprised how many 10-pound bulk bags of elderberries have already been scooped up by regular people to make their own elderberry syrup. Whatever we have left over we turn into elderberry syrup to sell at the winter market, but at the rate the berries are leaving the farm these days, I may not even get to it! If you are thinking of making elderberry syrup for your winter immune system, let me know if you are interested in a 10-pound bag.

shiitakes, husk cherries, and elderberries, photo by Adam Ford

shiitakes, husk cherries, and elderberries, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan, his dad, and our neighbor Greg got one of our tunnels re-skinned last week, which was great to have that project finished to be able to focus our attention on finishing up the third tunnel before winter.

Last week was also the Irene-aversary.

the new river bed at the old farm back in 2011, photo by Adam Ford

the new river bed at the old farm back in 2011, photo by Adam Ford

It’s been 8 years since the Mill River blasted a new path through our first farm. We usually take some time to reflect and see where we are since that event and what it still holds in our body, but we have been moving too fast just keeping up with the balancing act of farming with two little kiddos. So the cliff notes of our thoughts on Irene at 8 years out is:

  • what an endless blessing to be part of the vibrant and deep community of amazing people

  • how lucky we are to have rebuilt a farm up hill, away from the river in this beautiful corner of the world

  • climate change is terrifying and relentless and erosion will find us wherever water moves over bare soil

  • it’s imperative that farmers figure out how to maintain soil and sequester carbon for the future of feeding people in a chaotic climate

  • how life giving it is to take care of each other during these challenging times

little puppy Echo and Seera surveying the destroyed farm land after we had big machines smooth sand and paper fiber over the rock rubble to re-seed the field back to a hay field to be able to sell it and move on to new land, back in 2012, photo by Adam Ford

little puppy Echo and Seera surveying the destroyed farm land after we had big machines smooth sand and paper fiber over the rock rubble to re-seed the field back to a hay field to be able to sell it and move on to new land, back in 2012, photo by Adam Ford

Have a lovely week!

ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Sam, Sam, Dan, Cindy, Taylor, Grace, Casey, Vicki

Blistered Cherry Tomato Pasta Salad

  • pint of cherry tomatoes

  • 1 small zucchini, thinly sliced

  • 1 onion, thinly sliced

  • 1 bunch parsley, finely chopped

  • 2-3 cloves garlic, crushed

  • salt and pepper

  • olive oil

  • 1 tsp lemon juice

  • your noodles of choice

Cook pasta. Meanwhile, heat a pan with olive oil. Saute the onions on medium heat until lightly browned, add the zucchini, and cook until liquid is gone. Throw the cherry tomatoes and cook until they are ready to burst. Remove from the heat, toss with the pasta, crushed, garlic, chopped parsley, lemon juice, and salt and pepper to taste. This is excellent warm or cold!