What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, spinach, baby arugula, green curly kale, rainbow chard, parsley, new red potatoes, new yellow potatoes, basil, garlic, onions, cabbage, kohlrabi, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, sweet peppers, jalapeno peppers, husk cherries, leeks, acorn squash, butternut squash, spaghetti squash, and carrots!

lettuce transplants growing for fall harvest, photo by Adam Ford

lettuce transplants growing for fall harvest, photo by Adam Ford

Bulk Buying Opportunities!


If you are interested in any items when I list them, send me an email and I will get them packed up for you to pick up when you pick up your share. Bulk availability comes and goes, so if you are planning on doing preserving, don’t wait: they get spoken for quickly.This week we have:


  • jalapenos: $6 per pound or $20 for 4 pounds

  • rainbow chard: $25 for 10 bunches or $40 for 20 bunches *we use this like spinach, freeze in small batches for winter quiches, omelettes, pasta dishes, etc*

  • sweet basil: $12 per pound *I make my basil pesto go farther by using half basil, half parsley. There will be a limited amount of basil available each week for bulk buying, so reserve your interest now, and I will confirm what week it will be ready. This may be the last week of basil available, FYI*

  • roma tomatoes: $30 for 10 pounds

  • elderberries: $60 for 10 pound bag of frozen berries (available fresh, not frozen upon request, and this is the last we will have fresh ones)

  • cabbage: $1.50/pound

  • carrots: $2/pound

  • garlic: $12 per pound we have both seed and table garlic available

Sky knows how to turn on the market van, hooray! photo by Adam Ford

Sky knows how to turn on the market van, hooray! photo by Adam Ford


CSA Details

You can pick up your share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn, check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler.  You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. You can pick up your share at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market on the Okemo Mountain School Lawn between 4 pm and 7 pm. Please do not come before 4 pm: The market has challenging neighbors and the entire market’s permit will be revoked if products leave the market before 4 pm.

sometimes after work I cart around kids instead of veggies, photo by Adam Ford

sometimes after work I cart around kids instead of veggies, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

Less than half our tomato plants are still up and producing tomatoes at this point. The rest have been taken down and transplanted or seeded to winter greens. This process is so hard for me every year, but when it’s winter and the tunnels are booming with greens, I can’t even remember the feeling of how sad it is to rip out tomato plants.

a lonely green tomato left behind after the tomato plants were ripped out of this bed, photo by Adam Ford

a lonely green tomato left behind after the tomato plants were ripped out of this bed, photo by Adam Ford

Our CBD hemp plants are nearing their harvest time. If you are interested in any bulk amount of CBD hemp flowers to make your own CBD extractions, shoot me an email so I can reserve some for you.

Ryan’s wall of sunflowers, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan’s wall of sunflowers, photo by Adam Ford

We are finally turning our attention to jumping on finishing that third high tunnel. We need it closed up sooner than later so we don’t have to start worrying about the night time low temperatures when fall rolls around, and how they could damage tender baby greens without that layer of plastic protection.

third tunnel still under construction, but with baby kale growing for winter, photo by Adam Ford

third tunnel still under construction, but with baby kale growing for winter, photo by Adam Ford

Speaking of that new tunnel, if you pick up at the farm you may have noticed that the other tunnels have hand painted signs on them with weird names….. well only weird if you never read any Roald Dahl books to yourselves or kids. He is a quirky kids’ author, with one of his most famous books being Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Naming tunnels isn’t just fun, it’s essential on the farm, because it can often trip people up if you rely on directional signals: for instance, an instruction like “remove all the parsley from the 6th bed in the north tunnel” could be a huge downer if someone accidentally cleared out the south tunnel of parsley that was intended for winter production…. So we have silly names to make it all clear: The tunnel that is closest to the road is called the “Trunchbull.” We named it after the horrible head master in Roald Dahl’s book, Matilda. She would routinely throw kids in “the chokey” if they misbehaved, which was a tiny closet, 10” square with nails and broken glass in the walls and door that would poke kids if they tried to sit… awful right?! Well that first tunnel we built has these awful bolts at face height (for some of us it’s exactly the height of our eyes), on the inside of each bow that has snagged more than one of us as we walk up and down the tight outer path in the tunnel. It’s a terrible design, we don’t appreciate the injuries, and felt like it should absolutely be named the Trunchbull. The next tunnel is called the “BFG” which is the acronym for the character the Big Friendly Giant from another Roald Dahl book. This tunnel is super nice to us, and does not try to gouge our eyes out. The third tunnel got an excellent name suggestion from a CSA member, in keeping with the Roahl Dahl theme, it was suggested we name this third one “Wonka” after Willie Wonka from Charile and the Chocolate Factory. This is a fantastic idea, and it also got our creative ideas flowing, so right now the three name options we are debating between for the third tunnel are “Wonka,” “The Chocolate Factory,” or “The Great Glass Elevator.” (That third option being from the sequel to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.) I know this is some of the MOST IMPORTANT news to come out of the farm ever, so please feel free to weigh in on your opinion.

the crew harvesting some weedy bok choi and spinach, photo by Adam Ford

the crew harvesting some weedy bok choi and spinach, photo by Adam Ford

If you are free this Sunday from 3 to 6 pm consider attending the 5th Annual Harvest Fest which is the annual fundraiser for the Vermont Farmers’ Food Center, the building where the Rutland Winter Market is held. This is an awesome organization that is building the back bone of a food economy with access to fresh, safe food for this community, as well as a hub for aggregation and storage for food producers. We try to support the food center in any ways we can, and a delicious dinner with a cash bar and silent auction is low hanging fruit for us to attend. To learn more or buy tickets use the following link: http://www.vermontfarmersfoodcenter.org/2019_fall_harvest_festival. I also believe they will be selling tickets at the door if it hasn’t sold out if you decide last minute you want to attend. If you go, you will enjoy a delicious meal featuring local food from several area farms including tomatoes, garlic, carrots, fennel, butternut, cabbage, parsley, sage, jalapenos, and celeriac from us, YOUR CSA FARM!

Have a great week!

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Taylor, Dan, the Sams, Grace, and Cindy

light through lacinato kale leaves, photo by Adam Ford

light through lacinato kale leaves, photo by Adam Ford

Carmelized Alliums and Stewed Tomato Penne

2 medium onions (red, white or yellow), cut into thin strips

1 leek, cut into thin strips, use the entire leek, including greens

1 pound mini romas, cut in half

2 red peppers, roasted and de-seeded, de-skinned, chopped roughly

3-4 garlic cloves, crushed

4 TBSP olive oil

1 tsp dried oregano

1/2 tsp red pepper flakes

1/4 tsp nutmeg

1/4 tsp salt

penne pasta, cooked

parmesan cheese, freshly grated

Put red peppers whole on a baking tray and roast at 425 until the skins darken and the fruit is soft. Remove from the oven, and cover for 5 minutes. Uncover to let cool, remove skins and seeds, and then roughly chop and put aside. In a large skillet, saute the onions and leeks in olive oil on low until they lightly brown. Then add the garlic and mini romas with the oregano, nutmeg, red pepper flakes, and salt. When the tomatoes have cooked through, add the roasted red peppers and penne pasta. Toss together and serve with fresh parmesan. Enjoy!