What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, spinach, baby arugula, baby bok choi, green curly kale, rainbow chard, parsley, new red potatoes, new yellow potatoes, basil, garlic, onions, cabbage, kohlrabi, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, sweet peppers, jalapeno peppers, husk cherries, elderberries, leeks, acorn squash, butternut squash, spaghetti squash, eggplant, and carrots!

onions and carrots, photo by Adam Ford

onions and carrots, photo by Adam Ford


Bulk Buying Opportunities!


If you are interested in any items when I list them, send me an email and I will get them packed up for you to pick up when you pick up your share. Bulk availability comes and goes, so if you are planning on doing preserving, don’t wait: they get spoken for quickly.This week we have:


  • jalapenos: $6 per pound or $20 for 4 pounds

  • parsley: $14 for 10 bunches or $22 for 20 bunches *pesto and chimichurri*

  • rainbow chard: $25 for 10 bunches or $40 for 20 bunches *we use this like spinach, freeze in small batches for winter quiches, omelettes, pasta dishes, etc*

  • sweet basil: $12 per pound *I make my basil pesto go farther by using half basil, half parsley. There will be a limited amount of basil available each week for bulk buying, so reserve your interest now, and I will confirm what week it will be ready. This may be the last week of basil available, FYI*

  • heirloom tomatoes: $35 for 10 pounds

  • roma tomatoes: $30 for 10 pounds

  • elderberries: $60 for 10 pound bag of frozen berries (available fresh, not frozen upon request, and this is the last we will have fresh ones)

  • cabbage: $1.50/pound

  • carrots: $2/pound

  • garlic: $12 per pound we have both seed and table garlic available

garlic and tomatoes, photo by Adam Ford

garlic and tomatoes, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn, check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler.  You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. You can pick up your share at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market on the Okemo Mountain School Lawn between 4 pm and 7 pm. Please do not come before 4 pm: The market has challenging neighbors and the entire market’s permit will be revoked if products leave the market before 4 pm.

Ryan’s gorgeous flower garden, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan’s gorgeous flower garden, photo by Adam Ford



Farm News

We transplanted the first 3 beds in the new winter tunnel, even though we aren’t done building it yet. They are eager beds of kale, waiting to get sweetened up when their leaves freeze solid in the winter. We also transitioned some older tomato beds in one of the other tunnels to the first beds of winter chard. I enjoy thinking about the popularity of items throughout the year. For instance, right now people still choose and eat kale and chard each week, but it’s in much lower demand, but by the time winter rolls around and we will be harvesting these transplants we put in this week, those fly off the table at market within the first hour. It’s why I freeze kale and chard this time of year for my freezer to take out for egg dishes and pasta dishes, because I know I never take home extra of those in the winter.

looking kind of magical through the path to the winter squash field, photo by Adam Ford

looking kind of magical through the path to the winter squash field, photo by Adam Ford

We haven’t gotten around to putting our deer fence up this year. We just use a two-string electric fence, that encompasses about 15 acres or so of growing space. We have to take it down every winter because the snow comes up too high on it, and we can’t keep it hot. If the deer get used to being able to walk through the strands when they are off in the winter, they wouldn’t respect them in the summer. But the challenge is that it’s a big project to put it up every year. We have to clear brush and downed trees, string it back up, and then bait the whole area, as well as repair any breaks that occurred over the winter. This year, we are using the joint methods of spreading blood meal in areas where we find deer nibbling or tracks, letting one of our dogs sleep outside, and crossing our fingers. You are welcome to cross your fingers, too, because the fall crops look awesome right now, and we would like to be able to harvest them for the fall and winter. So far, so good. The deer seem to HATE the smell of blood meal, and I don’t blame them, it is so so gross.

we have a couple dozen fruit trees planted for a mini orchard, that we started when we moved the farm up here… most are still several years off from fruiting, but we are eager to eventually pick certified organic apples, plums, peaches, pears, and cherries from right outside our house….. here is a lonely deformed apple on one of the trees… we will still enjoy this apple when it’s ready, even if it’s the only one on the tree! photo by Adam Ford

we have a couple dozen fruit trees planted for a mini orchard, that we started when we moved the farm up here… most are still several years off from fruiting, but we are eager to eventually pick certified organic apples, plums, peaches, pears, and cherries from right outside our house….. here is a lonely deformed apple on one of the trees… we will still enjoy this apple when it’s ready, even if it’s the only one on the tree! photo by Adam Ford

The sweet peppers are turning red and orange nicely these days. I snagged a “farmer” pepper from the plants the other day, one that had a rotten bottom, that I ripped off so we could enjoy the rest. It was only about 1/3 ripened to red, but I curiously ate the green side and it was just as sweet as the red side. This is probably basic veggie knowledge, but it’s news to me, but I guess when any part of it starts to ripen to red, the whole fruit has begun transforming those starches into sugar, so even just a partially red pepper will taste like a red pepper. It was wild! The true test was feeding it to my toddler who devours the ripe ones, and he excitedly ate the entire thing, green side and all. How cool.

spaghetti squash, photo by Adam Ford

spaghetti squash, photo by Adam Ford

All our garlic is clipped and stored for winter. And before we know it we will be prepping the ground to plant next years garlic in just a few weeks. We are still waiting to be able to harvest the red onions for storage. The greens haven’t fully died back yet, which is our signal to start pulling them for curing.

red onion with a totally green stem still, with those delicious sour grass weeds growing around the bulb…. my favorite to snack on while weeding! photo by Adam Ford

red onion with a totally green stem still, with those delicious sour grass weeds growing around the bulb…. my favorite to snack on while weeding! photo by Adam Ford

And in a week or so, we will start harvesting and trimming the CBD hemp plants that we trialed this year. It’s likely going to be a big project, and we will miss running up and down the big plants.

Hope you all have a lovely week!

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Dan, Sam, Sam, Taylor, Grace, Cindy

Yes, one of Sky’s favorite projects is using the power drill to drill a timberlock screw in and out of a piece of lumber. By 4 this kid will be doing all our repair projects around here.

Yes, one of Sky’s favorite projects is using the power drill to drill a timberlock screw in and out of a piece of lumber. By 4 this kid will be doing all our repair projects around here.



Tomato Soup

We love having a salad, some excellent bread, and this soup, on these cooling late summer days. It’s a simple soup and keeps great in the fridge.

1 onion, finely chopped

3-4 cloves of garlic, crushed

2 pounds of mini romas (You can use any varieties for this recipe, I just love using the romas)

1/2 cup basil leaves

salt and pepper

5 TBSP olive oil

1 tsp oregano

1 cup milk of choice (cow, goat, almond, soy, coconut, whatever)

1/2 tsp fennel seed (optional)

1/2 tsp coriander (optional)

1/2 tsp red pepper flakes (optional)








Saute the onion and garlic in the olive oil in a medium pot over low heat. When they are fully cooked add the romas whole, with a splash of water so they don’t stick to the bottom. Keep the heat low, and squash the tomatoes as they cook so they produce enough juice to keep them from burning. Add the basil, salt, pepper and optional fennel, coriander, and red pepper flakes. (Those optional spices are what makes people think there is sausage in this soup.) When the tomatoes have fully cooked, blend the entire soup, and add the milk. Serve with crusty bread and delicious salad.