What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, green curly kale, parsley, zucchini, summer squash, new red potatoes, basil, red beets, yellow beets, garlic scapes, fresh garlic, sweet fresh onions, pickling cucumbers, cabbage, kohlrabi, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, yellow and purple sweet peppers, scallions, eggplant, jalapeno peppers, husk cherries, elderberries, leeks, and carrots!

baby lettuce, photo by Adam Ford

baby lettuce, photo by Adam Ford



CSA Payments Due

The balance of your summer sharewas due last week unless you have previously set up a payment plan with me. If you need a new payment plan, don’t hesitate to reach out. If you need to know your balance, let me know. As always, thanks for your continued support!

outdoor tomatoes, photo by Adam Ford

outdoor tomatoes, photo by Adam Ford

Bulk Buying Opportunities!

Whenever we have plenty to offer bulk buying discounts, I let our CSA members and their friends and family know about veggies available if you do any preserving. If you are interested in any items when I list them, send me an email and I will get them packed up for you to pick up when you pick up your share. Bulk availability comes and goes, so if you are planning on doing preserving, don’t wait: they get spoken for quickly when I tell everyone about them. This week we have:

  • jalapenos: $6 per pound or $20 for 4 pounds

  • parsley: $14 for 10 bunches or $22 for 20 bunches *pesto and chimichurri*

  • pickling cucumbers: $18 for 10 pounds or $30 for 20 pounds 

  • green curly kale: $25 for 10 bunches or $40 for 20 bunches *we use this like spinach, freeze in small batches for winter quiches, omelettes, pasta dishes, etc*

  • rainbow chard: $25 for 10 bunches or $40 for 20 bunches *we use this like spinach, freeze in small batches for winter quiches, omelettes, pasta dishes, etc*

  • sweet basil: $12 per pound *I make my basil pesto go farther by using half basil, half parsley. There will be a limited amount of basil available each week for bulk buying, so reserve your interest now, and I will confirm what week it will be ready*

  • heirloom tomatoes: $35 for 10 pounds

  • elderberries: $60 for 10 pound bag of frozen berries (available fresh, not frozen upon request)

  • garlic: $12 per pound we have both seed and table garlic available

If you have an interest in mini roma tomatoes in bulk, or heirloom seconds in bulk, please get in touch. We have a few restaurants who are scooping them all up, but I can reserve some for you with enough heads up.

bold looking celeriac leaves, photo by Adam Ford

bold looking celeriac leaves, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn, check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler.  You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. You can pick up your share at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market on the Okemo Mountain School Lawn between 4 pm and 7 pm. Please do not come before 4 pm: The market has challenging neighbors and the entire market’s permit will be revoked if products leave the market before 4 pm.


Farm News

The garlic has cured, so we are pulling it down and cleaning it up as needed. It’s great to have an indoor project like that for these rainy days with thunderstorms. We are still seeding wildly in the prop house for winter greens. The team is transplanting fall lettuce heads and Napa cabbage. And they continue to weed like pros to keep it under control out there. We are almost past that hump where we won’t have to worry as much about the speed of weed growth. It is a welcome surprise every year when they slow down.

sometimes you can find me packing wholesale orders in the cooler, photo by Adam Ford

sometimes you can find me packing wholesale orders in the cooler, photo by Adam Ford

This morning I harvested a couple bins of our fresh onions and it was so exciting to pull such big onions out of the ground! We are not known for our onion growing skills but it seems like this year we are going to have fantastic onions. We wish we knew what we did right this year to recreate this success, but for now, we will just revel in the onion production.

spraying down “farmer” carrots, photo by Adam Ford

spraying down “farmer” carrots, photo by Adam Ford

We are also harvesting the first leeks this week. If you only know leeks for potato leek soup, let me assure you they are awesome so many ways. You can slice a leek lengthwise, toss with olive oil and salt, and grill them or roast them. You can finely chop them and saute them. I put them in eggs every morning when leek season arrives. I love plenty of alliums (garlic, leeks, onions, shallots, scallions, etc) in all my food, so believe me, when a new one is harvested, it’s making it into my breakfast.

CBD hemp, photo by Adam Ford

CBD hemp, photo by Adam Ford

We are starting the big elderberry harvest this week, and that will continue for a bit. Our elderberry syrup was a big hit at last year’s winter market, so we plan to produce more of that. If you are interested in making your own elderberry syrup for your winter immune systems, we sell 10-pound bags of frozen elderberries (fresh if you prefer) for you to make your own. We love when people make their own, because then you get to avoid the cost of me making your syrup for you!

ripe elderberries, photo by Adam Ford

ripe elderberries, photo by Adam Ford

We are slowly picking away at the new tunnel….. really hoping to finish it sometime in September, but who knows.

Cindy working on the high tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

Cindy working on the high tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

We just got two new giant loads of compost delivered to the farm last weekend. One whole load is now spread in the new tunnel, and another load will be spread in the next several weeks in one of the new garden areas that Ryan had a lot of site work done to change our garden orientation for better soil erosion management. Since good compost is a scare, expensive resource, we use it when we start new growing areas for nutrients, but especially for soil texture. If we had access to high quality organic compost nearby we would use much more of it to improve our soil texture, but the nearest compost producer that meets or specifications is over an hour away, and that trucking adds up quick. (If you want to start a high quality, organic compost business within 20 minutes of our farm, we will be your first customers!)

I love so many things about Adam’s photos, and one of those things is how he not only captures the glory of the beautiful produce that pops out of these fields, but also the full cycle, such as these dying cucumber plants that we will pull down soon to make way for winter transplants in the tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

I love so many things about Adam’s photos, and one of those things is how he not only captures the glory of the beautiful produce that pops out of these fields, but also the full cycle, such as these dying cucumber plants that we will pull down soon to make way for winter transplants in the tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

Next week we will continue with seeding winter greens, transplanting, and hopefully putting a dent in the high tunnel.

Have a great week!

ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Dan, Cindy, the Sams, Casey, and Taylor

Elderberry Rosemary Scones with Elderberry Lemon Glaze

Scones:

2 cups flour

1 TBSP baking powder

1/2 tsp salt

2 TBSP maple syrup

1/2 tsp nutmeg

1 TBSP rosemary

5 TBSP cold butter, cut in chunks

1 cup fresh elderberries

1 cup yogurt

Glaze:

1/2 cup lemon juice

2 cups powdered sugar

1 TBSP butter

1 cup elderberries

Preheat oven to 400. Start with the glaze: In a pan cook 1 cup elderberries with the lemon juice on low. Let that simmer while you make the scones: Sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Cut the butter in the dry ingredient mixture so it looks crumbly. Mix the yogurt and maple syrup in. Fold in the elderberries gently. Once well mixed, press the dough on a lightly floured surface to about an inch think, and cut into triangles. Bake for about 15 on a cookie sheet. While they bake, return to the glaze. Whisk in the powdered sugar and butter. Let the scones and glaze cool a bit before drizzling over the scones. (And only glaze them to eat fresh, both the scones and glaze will keep well separate in the fridge.) Enjoy!