What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, green curly kale, parsley, French filet green beans, zucchini, summer squash, baby arugula, radish, new red and yellow potatoes, basil, red beets, yellow beets, garlic scapes, fresh garlic, shiitake mushrooms, sweet fresh onions, slicing cucumbers, pickling cucumbers, cabbage, kohlrabi, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, yellow and purple sweet peppers, cilantro, eggplant, jalapeno peppers, and carrots!

several lettuce plantings below the elderberries, photo by Adam Ford

several lettuce plantings below the elderberries, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Payments Due

The balance of your summer share is due this week unless you have previously set up a payment plan with me. If you need a new payment plan, don’t hesitate to reach out. If you need to know your balance, let me know. As always, thanks for your continued support!

investigating the drying garlic, photo by Adam Ford

investigating the drying garlic, photo by Adam Ford

Bulk Buying Opportunities!


Whenever we have plenty to offer bulk buying discounts, I let our CSA members know about veggies available if you do any preserving. If you are interested in any items when I list them, send me an email and I will get them packed up for you to pick up when you pick up your share. Bulk availability comes and goes, so if you are planning on doing preserving, don’t wait: they get spoken for quickly when I tell everyone about them. This week we have:

  • French filet green beans: $5 per pound or $23 for 5 pounds

  • jalapenos: $6 per pound or $20 for 4 pounds

  • parsley: $14 for 10 bunches or $22 for 20 bunches *pesto and chimichurri*

  • garlic scapes: $20 for 10 bunches or $35 for 20 bunches * garlic scape pesto, or use in place of garlic cloves in a parsley or basil pesto*

  • slicing cucumbers: $18 for 10 pounds or $30 for 20 pounds *slicing cucumbers can still be used for pickling… I lacto ferment batches of slicing cucumbers whole*

  • pickling cucumbers: $18 for 10 pounds or $30 for 20 pounds 

  • green curly kale: $25 for 10 bunches or $40 for 20 bunches *we use this like spinach, freeze in small batches for winter quiches, omelettes, pasta dishes, etc*

  • sweet basil: $12 per pound *I make my basil pesto go farther by using half basil, half parsley. There will be a limited amount of basil available each week for bulk buying, so reserve your interest now, and I will confirm what week it will be ready*

  • Roma Juliet tomatoes: $40 for 10 pounds , $70 for 20 pounds, $90 for 30 pounds

  • heirloom tomato SECONDS: $30 for 10 pounds (minor cracks, funny shapes, etc)

sunflowers checking out the cloud show, photo by Adam Ford

sunflowers checking out the cloud show, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn, check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler.  You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. You can pick up your share at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market on the Okemo Mountain School Lawn between 4 pm and 7 pm. Please do not come before 4 pm: The market has challenging neighbors and the entire market’s permit will be revoked if products leave the market before 4 pm.

yellow beet, photo by Adam Ford

yellow beet, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

We started seeding dozens and dozens of trays of the earliest winter greens last week. Crazy, right? I remember years ago when we were just starting a farm I tried to strike up a conversation with a much more experienced farmer at a winter farmers market, sometime in February, and I said, “So have you started your seeds yet?” The farmer looked kind of surprised and laughed and told me here never STOPS starting seeds… and now I get that. We are in the height of the summer harvest, enjoying tomatoes, the beginnings of eggplant and peppers, and yet we are also filling up our propagation house with thousands of seedlings that will be transplanted in the high tunnels before we know it, to harvest and enjoy all through the winter. That type of constant cycling is what enables us to run this farm year round and provide a wide variety of local food year round, but it is also what keeps us working year round and makes it difficult to pause and step away and breathe.

trays of seeded chard and kale for the tunnels, photo by Adam Ford

trays of seeded chard and kale for the tunnels, photo by Adam Ford

The entire garlic harvest was finished last week, and it is all hung and curing in the prop house rafters. We hang them in bundles that are small enough to pass air through well enough, and we put up a few large, industrial fans to keep constant air on them. In a couple weeks we will drop them down, cut off the tops, and get them into storage for the winter.

garlic curing in the prop house, photo by Adam Ford

garlic curing in the prop house, photo by Adam Ford

The team is doing a great job of keeping up with all the weeding for the fall crops. It looks like most things will be harvest-able thanks to their diligence in weed control.

this implement is called a tine weeder.. it gets pulled behind the tractor when plants are super small, but their roots are established enough to hold in the ground when the tine weeder runs over it. We run it early when weeds are in a phase called the “thread bare stage” and it pulls most weeds out and continues to give the plants a jump on the weeds. We use this wherever we can to postpone all the hoe and hand weeding the team cleans up with when plants are more mature, photo by Adam Ford

this implement is called a tine weeder.. it gets pulled behind the tractor when plants are super small, but their roots are established enough to hold in the ground when the tine weeder runs over it. We run it early when weeds are in a phase called the “thread bare stage” and it pulls most weeds out and continues to give the plants a jump on the weeds. We use this wherever we can to postpone all the hoe and hand weeding the team cleans up with when plants are more mature, photo by Adam Ford

We have been just keeping up with all the normal farm work of harvesting, washing, packing, marketing, weeding, and transplanting that we have put a default pause on our two high tunnel projects, but we are eager to return to that work later this week. There is still a lot to be done on them, and usually this time of year is our window. Once we start big bulk harvests in early fall (which is right around the corner, ah!) then we barely keep up with that and it’s hard to get infrastructure projects tackled. I know we can get it done, we always have, but everything is just a bit harder to squeeze in with two little kiddos around.

rock removal before by the Sams and Ryan, photo by Adam Ford

rock removal before by the Sams and Ryan, photo by Adam Ford

We are mostly feeling the work squeeze around here because we had one of our super awesome team members, Taylor, take an extended time off a couple weeks ago to take care of her youngest kiddo who was recently diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. It amazes me how resilient kids are, because her daughter was out here visiting, running around picking berries, excited to get her next blood sugar check, but as Taylor’s family adjusts to this new normal, she is taking time from the farm to focus all her mom energy on this new situation. We are doing the best we can being down one team member, and picking up some part time team members. We hesitate to talk about the team’s personal lives, (and to clarify, Taylor approved this message!), but at the same time, our team news IS farm news. This farm runs only as well as how our team is doing. We say our team is the best tool on the farm, so the full picture of what is going on around here includes how our team is doing. Taylor is an exceptional farmer and mother, and as a mother and farmer myself who knows how hard it is to do both well at the same time, I am grateful she is taking the time to help her kiddo adjust. And the farm will be happy if it ever works to have her back!

Next week we will continue seeding more greens for the winter tunnels…. more kales, chards, spinaches, parsley.

storage cabbage above our trial planting of CBD hemp, photo by Adam Ford

storage cabbage above our trial planting of CBD hemp, photo by Adam Ford

Have an excellent week!

ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Casey, Cindy, Sam, Sam, Dan, and Taylor


Maple Vinaigrette Green Beans

2 bags french filet green beans, tips removed

1 tsp olive oil

1 cup olive oil

3/4 cup lemon juice

1/4 cup maple syrup

4 cloves of garlic crushed

2 TBSP finely chopped parsley

salt and pepper

Toss green beans on a baking tray with 1 tsp olive oil. Bake at 325 for 10 minutes or until very lightly cooked. Remove from the oven. Meanwhile mix all the remaining ingredients together. Lightly dress the beans and enjoy! (Save remaining dressing for salads, sandwiches, more beans, marinade for grilled zukes, whatever!