What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, green curly kale, bunched chard, parsley, French filet green beans, zucchini, summer squash, salad turnips, radish, new potatoes, basil, red beets, yellow beets, garlic scapes, fresh garlic, sweet fresh onions, slicing cucumbers, pickling cucumbers, cabbage, kohlrabi, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, and carrots!

Sky running through the work site with Ryan, photo by Adam Ford

Sky running through the work site with Ryan, photo by Adam Ford

Barn Bonuses!

People have been enjoying be able to purchase some of our neighbor’s farm products, so we are having another neighbor drop off her blueberries for sale in the barn. Just like the beef and syrup, they cannot be swapped out as a CSA item, but rather purchased separately. They can be paid for in the cash box by the CSA board, just write down on the clip board how many you take.

The elderberry flowers have given way to green berries… Oh man, all I see here is all the time I have to spend in the kitchen turning these into elderberry syrup, photo by Adam Ford

The elderberry flowers have given way to green berries… Oh man, all I see here is all the time I have to spend in the kitchen turning these into elderberry syrup, photo by Adam Ford





Bulk Buying Opportunities!

Whenever we have plenty to offer bulk buying discounts, I let our CSAmembers know about veggies available if you do any preserving. If you are interested in any items when I list them, send me an email and I will get them packed up for you to pick up when you pick up your share. Bulk availability comes and goes, so if you are planning on doing preserving, don’t wait: they get spoken for quickly when I tell everyone about them. This week we have:

  • parsley: $14 for 10 bunches or $22 for 20 bunches *pesto and chimichurri*

  • garlic scapes: $20 for 10 bunches or $35 for 20 bunches * garlic scape pesto, or use in place of garlic cloves in a parsley or basil pesto*

  • slicing cucumbers: $18 for 10 pounds or $30 for 20 pounds *slicing cucumbers can still be used for pickling… I lacto ferment batches of slicing cucumbers whole*

  • pickling cucumbers: $18 for 10 pounds or $30 for 20 pounds 

  • green curly kale: $25 for 10 bunches or $40 for 20 bunches *we use this like spinach, freeze in small batches for winter quiches, omelettes, pasta dishes, etc*

  • sweet basil: $12 per pound *I make my basil pesto go farther by using half basil, half parsley. There will be a limited amount of basil available each week for bulk buying, so reserve your interest now, and I will confirm what week it will be ready*

More of Ryan’s flower garden…. maybe this is a lily?! I don’t know anything about flowers, I’m a veggie farmer, photo by Adam Ford

More of Ryan’s flower garden…. maybe this is a lily?! I don’t know anything about flowers, I’m a veggie farmer, photo by Adam Ford





CSA Details

You can pick up your share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn, check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler.  You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. You can pick up your share at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market on the Okemo Mountain School Lawn between 4 pm and 7 pm. Please do not come before 4 pm: The market has challenging neighbors and the entire market’s permit will be revoked if products leave the market before 4 pm.

We call this farmer food… the split radish and kohlrabi and partial greens bag… these things get sorted out in the wash station when they come in from the field to be cleaned up for sale. We pull them aside for all of us to take home and enjoy. Someone once overheard me talking about “farmer food” and they were like “Oh! Is that the BEST stuff you grow? The biggest tomatoes?! The sweetest pepper?! The greenest broccoli?!” Nah, farmer food is the stuff that is still totally delicious and awesome, but too ugly to present in public. But after those ugly kohlrabi go on the grill, no one’s going to know that they looked like this to start, photo by Adam Ford

We call this farmer food… the split radish and kohlrabi and partial greens bag… these things get sorted out in the wash station when they come in from the field to be cleaned up for sale. We pull them aside for all of us to take home and enjoy. Someone once overheard me talking about “farmer food” and they were like “Oh! Is that the BEST stuff you grow? The biggest tomatoes?! The sweetest pepper?! The greenest broccoli?!” Nah, farmer food is the stuff that is still totally delicious and awesome, but too ugly to present in public. But after those ugly kohlrabi go on the grill, no one’s going to know that they looked like this to start, photo by Adam Ford



Farm News

The first round of fall beets have all been transplanted which is miraculous, go team! They also snuck in all the fall broccoli. We are starting the big garlic harvest this week to make sure all of it happens in a timely manner before they sit in the ground too long. For those of you who also grow garlic and are often wondering when the best time to harvest them is, we go by when 3-4 leave have died back. Harvesting before that die back means you could have let the bulbs get bigger, and harvesting them much after that amount of die back means it can get difficult to get them out of the ground and they don’t store as long through the winter. So we start harvesting when there are about 3 leaves died back so we finish not long after that 4th goes down. We harvest, bundle them into bundles of about 20 stems, spray them off in the field, and then hang them to dry until they are properly cured.

The team planting yellow fall beets, photo by Adam Ford

The team planting yellow fall beets, photo by Adam Ford

This year we are delighted and amazed to say that most things look amazing in the field. We v=certainly have some hiccups, weed pressure that has overcome some crops, botryitis in the early tomatoes, broccoli that deer have mowed down, and plenty other challenges, but for the most part, everything looks amazing. That feels great, surprising, unfamiliar, and fills us with gratitude. This work is so hard, and it’s reason to celebrate when the majority of the work looks great. For example, even though the sweet peppers need a little more time, I feel like I wander around the hot pepper patch like a little spicy fairy, excitedly picking these early jalapenos a good month or more than I usually harvest them. Pro tip: put them in everything. Make a parsley jalapeno hummus. Hollow out the center, stuff it with cheese, wrap them in tin foil and grill them. Char them on the grill and then toss them in a maple syrup, soy sauce, lime marinade and serve with tacos. Slice them thin in your morning egg sandwich. Put them on your pizza. The list is endless.

The husk cherry trellis looks like it’s working nicely, can’t wait to start harvesting them… looks like there is one ready in the bottom right corner of this picture, though I am sure Sky found that one by now! photo by Adam Ford

The husk cherry trellis looks like it’s working nicely, can’t wait to start harvesting them… looks like there is one ready in the bottom right corner of this picture, though I am sure Sky found that one by now! photo by Adam Ford

This year’s potato plants look really fine and Ryan got the last hilling of them done last week. Thank goodness for tractor implements…. Our first two years of farming we hilled them all by hand with a hoe. My back hurts just typing about that years later.

The field crops may looks awesome, but it’s way past time for me to get in the prop house and tackle the overgrown weeds where all the plants used to be started! photo by Adam Ford

The field crops may looks awesome, but it’s way past time for me to get in the prop house and tackle the overgrown weeds where all the plants used to be started! photo by Adam Ford

The new cropping system Ryan set up this spring with larger blocks of growing space and larger sod swales in between has been working so nicely so far. We look forward to transitioning the rest of the fields next year. More than half the fields have been switched to that arrangement, and things are already growing better in one season for various reasons.

Frame of the third tunnel is up. This is one of the fields we will transition next year to the new cropping system, but things are growing in this area really well anyway. photo by Adam Ford

Frame of the third tunnel is up. This is one of the fields we will transition next year to the new cropping system, but things are growing in this area really well anyway. photo by Adam Ford

Our crew has been super heroes these past few weeks as we have often been working late tackling our infrastructure projects, and just generally working hard to meet the demands of the season. Farming would definitely wear me out to a point of throwing in the towel if we didn’t get to work with such a passionate, sweet, dedicated, fun group of people.

Ryan and Dan attempted getting the plastic on the second high tunnel very early one morning, but the way this roll was rolled at this specific manufacturer made if trickier than planned. So they had to scrap that attempt that morning and we will try again this week with a different set up. In this picture, Ryan is lifting the 300 pound roll of plastic up on a giant jig he built and put on the forks of the tractor. Dan is receiving it on the ridge before they would have rolled it down, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan and Dan attempted getting the plastic on the second high tunnel very early one morning, but the way this roll was rolled at this specific manufacturer made if trickier than planned. So they had to scrap that attempt that morning and we will try again this week with a different set up. In this picture, Ryan is lifting the 300 pound roll of plastic up on a giant jig he built and put on the forks of the tractor. Dan is receiving it on the ridge before they would have rolled it down, photo by Adam Ford

Hope everyone enjoys this awesome warm summer weather! Have a great week.

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Sam, Sam, Dan, Cindy, and Taylor



Recipe

ripening cherry tomatoes, photo by Adam Ford

ripening cherry tomatoes, photo by Adam Ford

It’s tomato season for sure now! And I am sure everyone has their favorite things to do with tomatoes. At least one of my meals each day is a simple tomato basil sandwich just to soak up the season. Below is a link to a delicious recipe sent to me by one of our CSA members. So simple and delicious. Check it out:

https://www.gimmesomeoven.com/5-ingredient-burst-tomato-spread/