What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, pea shoots, green curly kale, baby chard, bunched chard, parsley, French filet green beans, zucchini, summer squash, salad turnips, new potatoes, basil, red beets, yellow beets, garlic scapes, slicing cucumbers, pickling cucumbers, cabbage, kohlrabi, microgreens, tomatoes, shiitake mushrooms, and broccoli! 

I don’t want to count my chickens too early, but the celeriac is looking good this year!

I don’t want to count my chickens too early, but the celeriac is looking good this year!




Bulk Buying Opportunities!

Whenever we have plenty to offer bulk buying discounts, I let our CSA members know about veggies available if you do any preserving. If you are interested in any items when I list them, send me an email and I will get them packed up for you to pick up when you pick up your share. Bulk availability comes and goes, so if you are planning on doing preserving, don’t wait: they get spoken for quickly when I tell everyone about them. This week we have:

  • green zucchini, yellow zucchini, summer squash$17 for 10 pounds or $30 for 20 pounds (specify whether you want to mix and match or have all of one kind) *shred and freeze for zucchini bread or zucchini pancakes all winter long or slice and dry to add to soups*

  • parsley: $14 for 10 bunches or $22 for 20 bunches *pesto and chimichurri*

  • garlic scapes: $20 for 10 bunches or $35 for 20 bunches * garlic scape pesto, or use in place of garlic cloves in a parsley or basil pesto*

  • slicing cucumbers: $18 for 10 pounds or $30 for 20 pounds *slicing cucumbers can still be used for pickling… I lacto ferment batches of slicing cucumbers whole*

  • pickling cucumbers: $18 for 10 pounds or $30 for 20 pounds 

  • rainbow chard: $25 for 10 bunches or $40 for 20 bunches *we use this like spinach, freeze in small batches for winter quiches, omelettes, pasta dishes, etc*

  • green curly kale: $25 for 10 bunches or $40 for 20 bunches *we use this like spinach, freeze in small batches for winter quiches, omelettes, pasta dishes, etc*

  • sweet basil: $12 per pound *I make my basil pesto go farther by using half basil, half parsley. There will be a limited amount of basil available each week for bulk buying, so reserce your interest now, and I will confirm what week it will be ready*

We found this baby teething toy around this beet during harvest.. the beet grew right through it! I suppose SOraya dropped it while one of us was wearing her during transplanting several weeks ago!

We found this baby teething toy around this beet during harvest.. the beet grew right through it! I suppose SOraya dropped it while one of us was wearing her during transplanting several weeks ago!







CSA Details

You can pick up your share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn, check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler.  You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. You can pick up your share at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market on the Okemo Mountain School Lawn between 4 pm and 7 pm. Please do not come before 4 pm: The market has challenging neighbors and the entire market’s permit will be revoked if products leave the market before 4 pm.

The old tunnel ready to re-skin on the left, and the new tunnel going up on the right.

The old tunnel ready to re-skin on the left, and the new tunnel going up on the right.

Farm News

The ground posts for the new tunnel have been pounded in and the bows are up! This makes it look like a lot of work was done (and that is true), but with high tunnel construction we still have quite a ways to go to finish it. This will take a lot of our “spare” time these days as we tuck that project in around weeding, transplanting, and harvesting. We are also re-skinning one of our older tunnels, and we hope to get that new plastic on tomorrow, early in the morning before any breeze has picked up. It’s a fun, but wild job to re-skin a tunnel… We scamper around on the structure moving 200+ pound rolls of plastic around. It would be fun to tell my past younger self that my future job would require me to do some high stakes “tree climbing” on a metal structure with a gigantic piece of plastic. She would have thought adulthood could be fun after all. It’s exciting to get to add needed infrastructure to our farm, but any time we take on a project like this, we are really excited to take a break for a bit as well because it is super draining. Ryan tackles the brunt of managing these projects and his brain is full and worn out. We were planning to upgrade our wash station to be the 4-season wash station we need for the production we have been doing for several years now, but we both agree that we want to take a year off from big farm projects before diving in to that one. Plus, when it’s 90+ degrees outside in July, it’s hard to remember how miserable it is to be cold and wet in February washing greens with frozen fingers that feel ready to snap off. Right now that sounds just fine typing about it, even though in February I will long for these hot days.

Ryan’s dad helping put the bows up with a tractor jig.

Ryan’s dad helping put the bows up with a tractor jig.

Many things are growing well these days with this awesome heat and sun we have been having. We will even start having jalapenos ready soon for CSA, which is definitely the earliest I have ever harvested hot peppers in Vermont. It’s wild how this springs was the wettest, coolest, and latest we have ever grown in and yet now things have just started chugging along as soon as they got sun and heat. Ryan’s new husk cherry trellis is working well so far, but the true test will be when we start harvesting them, so for now, the jury is still out in how much we like it.

weeding some future baby lettuce

weeding some future baby lettuce

We have been diligently transplanting fall crops and seeding the many, many tens of thousands of beets we will transplant for winter storage. The fall carrots have come up nicely and relatively weed free for our farm. This is mainly because Ryan switched our main bed preparation tool to a power harrow which is significantly better for soil health and maintenance and doesn’t disturb the soil the way a rototiller does, while still making a bed we are able to seed and transplant into. Besides being an important tool we need to address long term soil health, it also does not disturb the soil way down and bring up so many new seeds into the weed seed bank. It’s super exciting to see the garden in the places where we have started using the power harrow.

This is a cool picture Ryan got of the difference a power harrow makes. The grassy bed on the left is a bed of arugula completely swallowed by grass. If was prepared by a rototiller. We cannot harvest from this bed because there are more weeds than arugula. The beds in the middle and on the right were prepared with the power harrow and have significantly less weed pressure. This is awesome.

This is a cool picture Ryan got of the difference a power harrow makes. The grassy bed on the left is a bed of arugula completely swallowed by grass. If was prepared by a rototiller. We cannot harvest from this bed because there are more weeds than arugula. The beds in the middle and on the right were prepared with the power harrow and have significantly less weed pressure. This is awesome.

It’s hard to believe, but it’s totally true, that in about a month we will start getting THREE tunnels ready and planted for winter greens! It is super exciting that we will produce that many more greens this winter, since we have never been able to fill the demand yet.

Ryan’s dad scoring some time with his youngest grandkid in the creek.

Ryan’s dad scoring some time with his youngest grandkid in the creek.

Hope everyone has a great week!

-The ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Dan, Taylor, Sam, Cindy, and Sam




Lime, Cucumber, Parsley Salad Dressing!

I cannot eat enough salad these days, so I am always trying new salad dressings. This one is fresh tasting and amazing. Serve it over a bed of lettuce with crumbled feta cheese, sliced cucumbers, sliced tomatoes, and thinly sliced fresh onions!

cucumber dressing.jpg

1 cucumber

1/2 cup lime juice

1/2 bunch parsley

1/2 bunch garlic scapes

1 TBSP maple syrup

1 cup olive oil

1 tsp dijon mustard

1 tsp salt

1 tsp pepper

Put all these ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Add olive oil and lime juice as needed to thin it out. Stores in the fridge for at least 2 weeks. Use it on salads, enjoy!