Thank you so much for your support by being a part of this year’s Spring Share! This is the last week of the Spring CSA Share. If you are interested in a summer share, and you haven’t already signed up, now is the time to do so: https://www.eveningsongcsa.com/csa-summer-share It starts next week. Thanks!

cucumber tendril, photo by Adam Ford

cucumber tendril, photo by Adam Ford

What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, baby bok choi, mesclun mix, arugula, spinach, pea shoots, rhubarb, parsley, cilantro, radishes, and starts for your garden! We know many of you keep gardens as well. This is the last week we will have plants available. Many varieties of things went way faster this year than previous years, but we still have: cilantro, dill, parsley, jalapeno peppers, habanero peppers, serrano peppers, poblano peppers, Italian sweet peppers, red bell peppers, Italian eggplant, husk cherries, yellow watermelon, cantaloupe, zucchini, summer squash, butternut squash, broccoli, kale, rainbow chard, brussels sprouts, beefsteak tomatoes, and pineapple tomatoes.

allium flower looking like the amazing firework that it is, photo by Adam Ford

allium flower looking like the amazing firework that it is, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your share at the farm on Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn, check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler. The available plants will be right inside the barn on your left.  You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. You can pick up your share at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market on the Okemo Mountain School Lawn between 4 pm and 7 pm. Please do not come before 4 pm: The market has challenging neighbors and the entire market’s permit will be revoked if products leave the market before 4 pm. Sorry for this inconvenience!

This year we took the radical step of removing the landscape fabric from the garlic so we could better top dress it with fertilizer. Because of all the wet weather, the garlic has not been able to take up the soil nutrients as well as we hope. Adding this feeding now will ensure an adequate garlic harvest later, photo by Adam Ford

This year we took the radical step of removing the landscape fabric from the garlic so we could better top dress it with fertilizer. Because of all the wet weather, the garlic has not been able to take up the soil nutrients as well as we hope. Adding this feeding now will ensure an adequate garlic harvest later, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

Ryan was able to get our tractor back in action at the end of last week. Then he promptly finished the plowing for the new fields.

the giant 3-bottom plow Ryan borrowed from a neighbor, photo by Adam Ford

the giant 3-bottom plow Ryan borrowed from a neighbor, photo by Adam Ford

field after plowing, photo by Adam Ford

field after plowing, photo by Adam Ford

This week we will start start the site work for the new high tunnel. Hooray! The Sams have been working away at putting together all the bows for the new high tunnel. If you pick up your CSA share at the farm, you will notice the stack of bows near the barn getting higher and higher. Meanwhile a bulldozer will level the ground where we will put it up, and then we will trench water lines. Shortly after that we can start putting up the structure. These structures are definitely fun to build, and they always take more time than we realize.

Sky is very excited for all the large equipment here this week to prep for the high tunnel, but he may think that his dump truck might be useful for the project too, sorry buddy, photo by Adam Ford

Sky is very excited for all the large equipment here this week to prep for the high tunnel, but he may think that his dump truck might be useful for the project too, sorry buddy, photo by Adam Ford

The farm is still too wet in some areas to do what we need to do. But we finally finished transplanting onions and leeks. That feels awesome. We still haven’t been able to prep the ground for potatoes, and it’s getting pretty late in the season for those. It will all work out, but we would really like to pop those in the ground at this point. Each day we have to wait to get the potatoes in the ground correlates to a smaller cumulative yield of potatoes at the end of the season. We are keeping up with all the smaller, regular transplantings of kales, beets, cilantro, lettuce, etc, so that feels really good as well. We are starting to catch up on weeding projects, and always staying ahead of the trellising of tomatoes.

tomatoes are coming along! photo by Adam Ford

tomatoes are coming along! photo by Adam Ford

Sam and Ryan started soaking shiitake logs. We should start harvesting those in a couple weeks. Shiitakes are a warm weather crop, and we had to wait until the temperatures we were right before we could start shocking them. Soaking, shocking, what does all that mean? To cultivate log-grown shiitakes, first we harvest several oak and sugar maple trees. We drill lots of holes into 4-foot logs. Those holes are filled with spawn, and sealed with a cheese wax. Then they sit for a year to fully inoculate the log. Once they are ready to use, each week we soak, or shock, a pallet’s worth of logs in large water troughs. Then they are removed from the water and individually laid against a stand so it looks like a long lean-to. When they are ready to be harvested, we cut the fruit off each log and stack the logs back on the pallet they came from. We always have several batches going in different stages. At this point we feel like we manage a decent sized shiitake yard with several dunk bins and set-ups to lean them all up. If you pick up at the farm, look left as you pull in the driveway to see the shady shiitake yard. Growing shiitakes is heavy work moving all those logs around several times for each fruiting. It’s nice that it is grown without disturbing soil, and it’s also nice to get the chance to get a break from working in the full sun in the fields (not an issue so far this season!) to work in the shade of the shiitake yard.

All the baby goats are in their new homes, hooray! photo by Adam Ford

All the baby goats are in their new homes, hooray! photo by Adam Ford

Next week we hope to tackle the potato planting as well as winter squash. Then we will have the majority of our full season plants in the ground finally!

Have a great week and thanks for letting us grow your food!

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Sam, Sam, Dan, Taylor, and Cindy

Parsley Pesto

Pestos are a staple food in our house. We obviously love the first basil pesto of the season, but if we only ate basil pesto, we wouldn’t be eating enough of that great green stuff. We make pestos out of anything, cilantro, spinach, pea shoots, arugula, parsley, etc. Parsley pesto is a special favorite of mine. Great on pasta, sandwhiches, eggs, meats, roasted vegetables, in salad dressings, really whatever. It’s great to have in the fridge.

image from geniuskitchen.com

image from geniuskitchen.com


2 bunches of parsley

1 cup of sunflower seeds

1/4 cup of lemon juice

1 tsp salt

3-6 cloves of garlic

1 cup olive oil

Blend all the ingredients together until smooth. Add extra olive oil or salt as needed.