What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, head lettuce, baby bok choi, pea shoots, green garlic, scallions, green curly kale, lacinato kale, baby kale, baby chard, bunched chard, rhubarb, parsley, salad turnips, cilantro, basil, beets, garlic scapes, and cucumbers.

trellised cucumber plants: When they get this tall, we lower the plants by releasing the tension on those white roller hooks, the bottom of the plants start laying on the ground where the cucumbers have already been harvested from so the plant can keep growing vertically for more production, photo by Adam Ford

trellised cucumber plants: When they get this tall, we lower the plants by releasing the tension on those white roller hooks, the bottom of the plants start laying on the ground where the cucumbers have already been harvested from so the plant can keep growing vertically for more production, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn, check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler.  You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. You can pick up your share at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market on the Okemo Mountain School Lawn between 4 pm and 7 pm. Please do not come before 4 pm: The market has challenging neighbors and the entire market’s permit will be revoked if products leave the market before 4 pm.

Dan and Taylor seeding, photo by Adam Ford

Dan and Taylor seeding, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

What a week! Last week the flash flooding that hit on Thursday did some damage at the farm, mostly in ditches and roadways. The silver lining to that storm is that is showed us that the work Ryan just had done to make our growing fields more resilient to these quick heavy storms that are becoming more frequent is working. I think I described the field changes during the spring newlsetter, so if you are curious you can check back recent posts to learn about the changes we are making. The brief description is that we are turning out 4-5 acres of growing space into dozens of small 100’ x 40’ growing spaces with wide, grassy low swales between to catch and move water from the fields and into ditches to prevent large erosion events from affecting our growing spaces. It’s a massive overhaul, but it’s working, and that is heartening with all the attention and care we put into soil building and retention. Soil is our most important asset, and without it we can’t grow food. There are still some long term solutions that we need to solve for the areas that were damaged by the flooding, but for now, we applied enough bandaids to keep rolling along.

driving lane in one of our fields that failed, photo by Taylor Morneau

driving lane in one of our fields that failed, photo by Taylor Morneau

one of the failed ditches, photo by Adam Ford

one of the failed ditches, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan seeding one of the repaired ditches, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan seeding one of the repaired ditches, photo by Adam Ford

Sky pointing out the obvious: “gotta keep the culverts from clogging so they do their job, mama”, photo by Adam Ford

Sky pointing out the obvious: “gotta keep the culverts from clogging so they do their job, mama”, photo by Adam Ford

Besides coming home to flooding damage, we are also catching up to the weather finally (maybe?) getting warmer and sunnier and seeing things grow better. We got the rest of the potatoes planted (finally!), and started catching up on trellising many of the tomato plants that got away from us. Over lunch yesterday, the team described how on one row of tomato plants they estimated taking off over 75% of the plant material from each plant to get all the suckers and leaf branches under control. Tomatoes are truly wild! We transplanted our next round of broccoli and cabbage, and in the same day seeded the fall broccoli and cabbage. I really enjoy doing different things with the same crop in the same day, connecting me from one season to the next very directly. Would have been awesome if our first round of broccoli and cabbage was ready to harvest to really do all three steps in one day!

eggplant flowers, photo by Adam Ford

eggplant flowers, photo by Adam Ford

Now we are hoping to catch up to trellising peas and outdoor tomatoes, and then take a big bite out of the weeds. Our cultivated vegetables may not have appreciated the cool, wet fall, but the weeds did! It’s time to get those back in control:

This Thursday from 3pm to 5pm we will be rescue weeding a few areas, and then enjoying each other's company with some delicious and garden based food after weeding. (At least pea shoot-parsley-garlic scape pesto pasta and a summer beet salad. Yum.) If anyone is able and interested, feel free to join us for some weeding anytime during that window, and stay for some thank you food. Feel free to come by too even if you may not be able to work, for instance if you have small children in tow.

wild tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

wild tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

And in other news, mark your calendars for July 6th: We will be hosting a potluck and concert featuring The Horse Eyed Men and Maggie Carson at 5:30. More details soon.

Enjoy this sunshine and have a great week!

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Taylor, Dan, the Sams, Cindy

We have been delighting in watching a mama robin build a nest this spring, tend her eggs, hatch them, and in this shot they are about to fly! photo by Adam Ford

We have been delighting in watching a mama robin build a nest this spring, tend her eggs, hatch them, and in this shot they are about to fly! photo by Adam Ford



Pea Shoot Parsley Garlic Scape Pesto

1 bag pea shoots

1 bunch parsley

1 bunch garlic scapes

1 cup sunflower seeds

2 tsp salt

2 tsp lemon

1 1/2 cup olive oil

1/4 cup water

Blend all ingredients together until smooth. Add additional olive oil to achieve your desired thickness. This is fantastic on pasta, as a spread on sandwiches, in egg dishes, in wraps, as a dip, or as baby food. (Seriously— both my kids eat pesto by the spoonful.)