How To Use This Newsletter

Each week you will receive a newsletter with what's available to choose from, any important details about the CSA, farm news, and a recipe. We keep the most important information at the top, so if you don't have time to read a newsletter, anything you need to know will be in the beginning before the section labeled "Farm News." There will also be a button up top you can click on if you have any questions. Some questions are common so we created answer page that may be helpful. If you have any questions that aren't answered here, please don't hesitate to reach out!

cucumber tendril, because Adam knows these will ALWAYS mesmerize me…. I mean have you ever SEEN these things up close. These days they remind me of little infant hands who are trying to walk… Whatever is nearby they will grab and supportively wrap themselves around to get more upright, whether it’s basil plants or a different cucumber, plus they are gorgeous, photo by Adam Ford

cucumber tendril, because Adam knows these will ALWAYS mesmerize me…. I mean have you ever SEEN these things up close. These days they remind me of little infant hands who are trying to walk… Whatever is nearby they will grab and supportively wrap themselves around to get more upright, whether it’s basil plants or a different cucumber, plus they are gorgeous, photo by Adam Ford

What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, baby bok choi, mesclun mix, baby arugula, baby spinach, pea shoots, green garlic, green curly kale, lacinato kale, baby chard, bunched chard, rhubarb, parsley, salad turnips, radishes, and CUCUMBERS!! We may keep the cucumbers hidden behind the table at market JUST for CSA members to make sure everyone can have some, so if you are looking for cucumbers at either market, just ask us. THIS is the bonus of CSA…. We hide the best stuff for you all until we have an abundance to sell at market.

baby lettuce to harvest later this week, photo by Adam Ford

baby lettuce to harvest later this week, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn, check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler.  You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. You can pick up your share at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market on the Okemo Mountain School Lawn between 4 pm and 7 pm. Please do not come before 4 pm: The market has challenging neighbors and the entire market’s permit will be revoked if products leave the market before 4 pm.

My mom talking Soraya on a little walk… If you look closely her hands are grabbing my mom’s like a cucumber tendril.. seriously, photo by Adam Ford

My mom talking Soraya on a little walk… If you look closely her hands are grabbing my mom’s like a cucumber tendril.. seriously, photo by Adam Ford

If you pickup at the barn: We have two very sweet dogs, one who is poorly behaved and may jump on you despite all our best efforts. We apologize in advance if she jumps on you. The other dog is super sweet as well, but can have an intimidating bark if you haven't met him. Neither of these dogs will pose a danger to you or your kiddos. 

If you pickup at market: Please check your name off on the clip board or ask one of us to check you in. Thanks!

Payments are due: Half of your remaining balance is due. If you need a different payment schedule, and haven’t already set one up, just let me know. We are happy to work with you.

garlic looking good and disease free, but we would like to see much more heft to this at this time of year, photo by Adam Ford

garlic looking good and disease free, but we would like to see much more heft to this at this time of year, photo by Adam Ford

Bonuses in the Barn

If you pick up your CSA share in our barn, and are looking great local, certified organic grassfed beef or local, wood fired maple syrup, we have both available for sale from neighboring farms. The beef is in the freezer to the left of the CSA sign in board, and the maple syrup is right next to the board. It is important to note that these are not things that can be swapped for items in your CSA.  These are completely separate from our business: we are just offering the space to our neighbors. If you want to buy any of these products, fill out the sheet in front of the CSA sign in board, and leave payment in the CSA payment box, and we will pass it along to them.  

supplies for the next high tunnel waiting their turn, with the tiny little kids’ garden I am putting in this year so that the kids that come pick up their items from the barn later in the summer can pick their very own peas, cherry tomatoes, husk cherries, and flowers! photo by Adam Ford

supplies for the next high tunnel waiting their turn, with the tiny little kids’ garden I am putting in this year so that the kids that come pick up their items from the barn later in the summer can pick their very own peas, cherry tomatoes, husk cherries, and flowers! photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

We are totally enjoying this sun! It will take a couple weeks for the gardens to reflect the sunny, warm weather as everything essentially sat still in the fields during all the cool, wet weather. For those of you who were not part of the spring share, reading the repetitive weekly updates about how everything was wet and cold, and too muddy to get in the fields, the brief recap is that we are a couple weeks behind getting the large plantings put in the ground. By the time you are reading this we will probably have all the winter squash planted (yay!), potatoes planted (super yay!), and all the last few smaller plantings. We hope to finally get the peas trellised, as well as the later tomatoes.

Dan and The Sams planting potatoes, photo by Adam Ford

Dan and The Sams planting potatoes, photo by Adam Ford

One of the downers of such a cold and wet start to the year is that plants aren’t growing the way we need them to. We uncovered the zucchini the other day to allow for pollination, and the plants are waaaaaaaay smaller than they should be for hosting so many blossoms. Usually the plants put on much more green growth to support the subsequent fruiting. It’s likely that plants like zucchini will rebound just fine with some sun and warmth since they are such tenacious plants, but we hope it won’t affect yield. This is similar for other plants as well. Basically they are getting the signal that there isn’t enough warmth and sun to continue vegetative growth, so they should put their energy into fruiting and flowering… the natural reproductive cycle for plants.

Ryan is having Jay dig these 8 foot wide swales between every 40 feet of garden space. They will drain water out with water bars to gravel drainage on the sides of the fields, reducing the risk of big erosion events in the future, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan is having Jay dig these 8 foot wide swales between every 40 feet of garden space. They will drain water out with water bars to gravel drainage on the sides of the fields, reducing the risk of big erosion events in the future, photo by Adam Ford

Next week we are away on vacation, which is an enormous gift our team gives us each year. (Last year instead of vacation we had a baby in July, so we are really looking forward to this time away.) Leaving for nearly a week makes things a bit chaotic leading up to our departure. When we had planned going away this time of year, we assumed all the fields would be done being planted at least 2 weeks ago. So it’s a little stressful packing everything in last minute. On top of that, Ryan is managing the dual large projects of prepping the ground for the next high tunnel, and also transforming our fields to be managed more resiliently in future heavy rain storms. Both projects require a lot of earth moving and oversight of an excavator, so I applaud Ryan for having his brain in what feels like 5 places at all times these days. I look forward to sharing future pictures of how the fields have been changed to address the weather intensity of a changing climate.

This is one of those swales finished, seeded to grass, and mulched. I. LOVE. IT. photo by Adam Ford

This is one of those swales finished, seeded to grass, and mulched. I. LOVE. IT. photo by Adam Ford

Have a lovely week!

The ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Cindy, Taylor, Sam, Sam, and Dan

Jay fixing the drainage area north of the tunnels, to help the water that is shed from the tunnels move more effectively into the culvert into the creek, photo by Adam Ford

Jay fixing the drainage area north of the tunnels, to help the water that is shed from the tunnels move more effectively into the culvert into the creek, photo by Adam Ford

Arugula and Radish Fritata

image from PBS.com

image from PBS.com

This recipe has so many great flavors, and even though it has several steps, it is actually quite quick to make. Excellent for dinner, brunch, breakfast, lunch, really whenever! (Little secret: I really don’t like radishes, and I don’t often reach for arugula if I have other greens choices, but I LOVE this recipe.)

1 bag arugula

3-4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped

1 bunch parsley, finely chopped

1/2 bunch of radishes, thinly sliced

1 TBSP maple syrup

1/4 cup milk

2 TBSP olive oil

6 eggs

1 cup swiss cheese, shredded

1 cup parmesan, shredded

salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 350. Saute garlic in 1 TBSP olive oil in a large cast iron pan, until garlic is lightly browned. Turn off the heat, add arugula to the pan, and stir to lightly wilt. In a separate bowl whisk eggs with cheese, milk, salt and pepper, and 3/4 of the parlsey. In a separate bowl, mix radishes, maple syrup, and 1 TBSP olive oil. Pour the egg mixture over the arugula in the pan. Bake for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven, and evenly distribute the radish mixture on the top of the fritatta. Return tray to oven and bake for another 20 minutes, or until the eggs are solid when you pierce it with a knife. Remove from the oven and let sit at room temperature for 10 minutes. Serve with remaining fresh parsley. Enjoy!