What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, baby bok choi, mesclun mix, arugula, spinach, pea shoots, rhubarb, parsley, cilantro, radishes, and starts for your garden! I know some of you keep a garden as well as get veggies from us, so plants will be available starting this week through the first week in June. Plants that will be available this week include: cilantro, dill, jalapeno peppers, habanero peppers, Italian sweet peppers, red bell peppers, rainbow bell peppers, Italian eggplant, husk cherries, broccoli, kale, rainbow chard, brussels sprouts, beefsteak tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, and heirloom tomatoes.

Garlic growing in landscape fabric.. It’s looking good this year, but showing signs of being hungry, probably because of all of the rain. Ryan foliar fed them with fish over the weekend as it rained, so it was nicely watered in. (Sometimes if fish emulsion stays on the leaves in the sun it can “burn” them a bit, so it was fortuitous that we had the rain to take it right down to the roots.) photo by Adam Ford

Garlic growing in landscape fabric.. It’s looking good this year, but showing signs of being hungry, probably because of all of the rain. Ryan foliar fed them with fish over the weekend as it rained, so it was nicely watered in. (Sometimes if fish emulsion stays on the leaves in the sun it can “burn” them a bit, so it was fortuitous that we had the rain to take it right down to the roots.) photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your share at the farm on Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn, check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler. The available plants will be right inside the barn on your left.  You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. The Ludlow Farmers’ Market open this weekend, so you can pick up your share in Ludlow on the Okemo Mountain School Lawn between 4 pm and 7 pm. Please do not come before 4 pm: The market has challenging neighbors and the entire market’s permit will be revoked if products leave the market before 4 pm. Sorry for this inconvenience!

hyacinth, photo by Adam Ford

hyacinth, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

This week’s adventure is repairing a tractor wheel! Ryan’s brain has been hard at work making a huge shift to our field production methods to keep up with the frequency of heavy rainstorms, and the challenges they pose for erosion control. We are switching out cropping systems to create several over 40 small “gardens” that are about 1/10th of an acre each. Crazy, but awesome. That being said, he is taking certain areas out of production this season to plow these newly oriented micro fields, and then either cover crop them or cover them with a tarp to kill start killing the weed seed bank. This week he borrowed a neighbor' farmer’s GIANT plow and got to work during that day of dry, sunny weather we had. As farm luck would have it, a giant rock got stuck between the tire and the housing under the tractor and bent the rim of the tractor wheel. He is working to remove that wheel to attempt repairing the rim before getting the tire put back on. Farm hiccups take a surprising amount of work to iron out. It’s pretty much the only thing his brain has been working on since Monday. We are hoping to have the tractor up and running again by early next week. We need it for other work, such as prepping more beds for transplants that are excited to go out in the field.

This photo was taken shortly before the tractor versus rock incident occurred, and it shows one of the fields in transition. Way in the background, that upper field is being plowed to create the smaller garden plots. The left area that is all brown has been plowed, and the green area on the right will be plowed when the tractor is back together. photo by Sam E.

This photo was taken shortly before the tractor versus rock incident occurred, and it shows one of the fields in transition. Way in the background, that upper field is being plowed to create the smaller garden plots. The left area that is all brown has been plowed, and the green area on the right will be plowed when the tractor is back together. photo by Sam E.

Meanwhile, the tomato plants in the tunnel continue to look beautiful. The greens growing around them are almost all harvested out from the spring share. When they are all cleared out, we will do a comprehensive weeding and then mulch around the tomatoes, basil, and parsley to control weeds for the season. We will weed most of the tunnel with straw, but this year Ryan is also running an experiment with mulching with rice hulls in about 15 feet of bed space to see if that’s an adequate mulch material. It would be awesome to use since it is a waste product.

growing pea shoots can be a bit fa pain in our prop house. we grow them like microgreens, so they need regular watering to keep them from getting dried out. This week Ryan, Sam, and Sam built a permanent bed for pea shoot seedings to see if they can be simplified a bit by being in the ground. photo by Adam Ford

growing pea shoots can be a bit fa pain in our prop house. we grow them like microgreens, so they need regular watering to keep them from getting dried out. This week Ryan, Sam, and Sam built a permanent bed for pea shoot seedings to see if they can be simplified a bit by being in the ground. photo by Adam Ford

Yesterday the crew worked in some gnarly cool, rainy weather transplanting most of the rest of the onions that need to go out. I applaud farmers. Our team is top notch, and I am especially impressed when we meet up at lunch, and they are cold and wet and still awesome, nice people, not outwardly peeved that they were working in garbage weather. Go farmers.

this is what the onion field looks like as we transplant them in. Lots of landscape fabric with holes every 8 inches…. so many onions to do! photo by Adam Ford

this is what the onion field looks like as we transplant them in. Lots of landscape fabric with holes every 8 inches…. so many onions to do! photo by Adam Ford

When the tractor is back in action we will hopefully get the potato field prepped for that planting to go in. We aren’t worried about how far behind some of our plantings are, we really feel like we won’t notice it as the season goes on, but we will still feel awesome when it all gets caught up. Here’s to the weather drying out, warming up, and the tractor repair going smoothly and quickly.

The Sams (as we affectionately call both Sams on the crew) started putting together to bows for the new high tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

The Sams (as we affectionately call both Sams on the crew) started putting together to bows for the new high tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

Have a great week!

ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, the Sams, Taylor, Dan, and Cindy


Roasted Radishes with Chimichuri

image from everylastbite.com

image from everylastbite.com

This is a really simple side dish, snack, or addition over a green salad. Though radishes are mostly eaten raw, they can also be cooked. (Fun fact: I think that radishes taste like crunchy, boiled rubberbands unless they are roasted, so I only eat them cooked!)

2 bunches radishes

1 bunch parlsey

1 bunch cilantro (optional if you don’t like cilantro)

4-5 cloves of garlic

1/4 cup olive oil and 1 TBSP olive oil

1/4 cup lime juice

1 tsp maple syrup

salt and pepper

Remove radish greens. Toss radishes in 1 TBSP olive oil and a pinch of salt and spread them on a baking sheet. Roast at 400 until lightly browned. Meanwhile, put all the remaining ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. When radishes are done, dip them in this bright, flavorful chimichuri!