What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, mesclun mix, baby arugula, baby bok choi, spinach, pea shoots, radishes, scallions, potatoes, garlic, beets, celeriac, and gilfeather turnip.

this is the wildness of a spring high tunnel… interplanted overwintered spinach and scallions, old mesclun beds that have flowered and are about to be turned in to plant summer crops, some beds already tilled in, waiting to become green beans, photo by Adam Ford

this is the wildness of a spring high tunnel… interplanted overwintered spinach and scallions, old mesclun beds that have flowered and are about to be turned in to plant summer crops, some beds already tilled in, waiting to become green beans, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your share at the farm on Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn,. ,check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler. You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 10 am to 2 pm. If you want your share delivered to Ludlow, use this form by 9 am on Friday to select the veggies you want for the week:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdeOfUuyadzYHjCHOX5RCye_qOWaqttPQQY2FPxVAlrQWhmWg/viewform . Then you can pick up your share from Four Season's Sotheby's International Realty between 2 pm and 5 pm. They are next to Java Baba's in the shopping plaza across from the main entrance to Okemo Mountain. 

you will eat these pea shoots in two weeks… these exact ones, photo by Adam Ford

you will eat these pea shoots in two weeks… these exact ones, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

Well, this week's weather is thwarting our hopes to get the first transplants out in the field. A lot of our growing space is wetter by nature, and with all these rainy days, we will need a few sunny days to dry it our enough to get in the fields. The plants will continue to look good in their cells through next week, but next week will be a PACKED week between catching up on transplanting and then doing the next round of tomato trellising!

lettuce, beets, spinach, cilantro, and more are waiting in the hardening out zone to be transplanted, photo by Adam Ford

lettuce, beets, spinach, cilantro, and more are waiting in the hardening out zone to be transplanted, photo by Adam Ford

In the meantime, this week we have been tackling lots of odds and ends that are never urgent enough to make time for, but when we postpone them so long, they add up. It's helpful to take a stab at many of those projects. 

The first round of indoor green beans are going in the tunnel this week. And we continue to seed our succession seedings each week in the greenhouse. 

the easrly tomatoes have received their first round of trellising, and by next week they will likely be aching for round 2, photo by Adam Ford

the easrly tomatoes have received their first round of trellising, and by next week they will likely be aching for round 2, photo by Adam Ford

This week's climate change observation is in the form of opportunity: We grow a handful of peach trees, and perhaps this will be the first year some will bare fruit. Although we grow varieties that are hardy to this climate, it seems like they are just barely hardy enough for our zone. Every winter we wrap the trees to give them an extra layer of protection from those epicly cold spells we can get in January and February. But even with that wrapping we tend to lose a tree or a branch, or growth, or something, because 30 below zero is just too cold for peaches, and we have always counted on having a few nights get that low each winter. But not this winter! (And we even forgot to wrap the trees!) The lack of super cold was excellent for winter greens and looks like it's excellent for our peach trees. Climate and weather shouldn't be confused with each other when discussing our climate crisis. And this observation is pretty close to muddying those waters. Without catastrophic climate change, it's totally plausible to have a mild winter here or there. But if we go year after year of not having to wrap our peach trees, and still get to sink our teeth into a delightful summer peach, I know I'll be eating that peach with a sense of unease.... like I want to love the delicious prospect of enjoying peaches with less work in Zone 4, but I also know it's coming along with other bigger concerns. 

I was telling Sky about how in the future, mama will have to kick her car habit and get back on a bike more, so he wanted to try mama’s bike… Soraya was bored about the continued lessons in climate change, so she just snoozed on my back, photo by Adam Ford

I was telling Sky about how in the future, mama will have to kick her car habit and get back on a bike more, so he wanted to try mama’s bike… Soraya was bored about the continued lessons in climate change, so she just snoozed on my back, photo by Adam Ford


Meanwhile, the tulips are popping out of the ground, the forsythia is blooming, the grass is almost tall enough to put the goats on pasture, and the seedlings in the greenhouse are chugging along. I am really happy with what our seedings look like this year. I'm not exactly sure what the key to their success is this year, but every year we are addressing issues from the past, and maybe that hyper focus on improvement is starting to see some results in the form of strong, healthy plants. Even my habaneros look good this year, which I have been trying to improve for years. Maybe we will have some beautiful orange bombs this fall!

tulip! photo by Adam Ford

tulip! photo by Adam Ford

Here's to enough sun to get the transplanting done next week! 

ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Dan, Sam, Taylor, and Cindy





Scallion Pancakes

image from Splendid Table, Carl Tremblay

image from Splendid Table, Carl Tremblay

These are super fun as a side dish or a breakfast. If you are new to making them, check out this you tube video https://youtu.be/0EgspSFnORo which visually walks you through how to make them. (The recipe I use, from the Splendid Table, is different and I don’t have the dough sit overnight if I don’t remember in time, I just give it a half hour. Also, I use at least twice as many scallions as it looks like she adds in this video. But this helps you see how they are formed better than a recipe narrative.)

Dipping Sauce

  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce

  • 1 scallion, sliced thin

  • 1 tablespoon water

  • 2 teaspoons rice vinegar

  • 1 teaspoon honey

  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

  • Pinch red pepper flakes

Pancakes

  • 1 1/2 cups flour

  • 3/4 cup boiling water

  • 6 tablespoons vegetable oil

  • 2 tablespoon toasted sesame oil

  • 1 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

  • bunch of scallions (minus the one you used in the dipping sauce.

Mix the dipping sauce and set aside. Mix the flour and bowling water in a bowl. When it is cool enough to handle, knead on a floured surface until a nice ball forms. Cover and let rest for a half hour. Heat the sesame oil and 1 TBSP vegetable oil, and mix it together with 1 TBSP flour, and set aside. Put a large pan over low heat with 2 TBSP vegetable oil. Divide dough in thirds. Roll a section out very flat into a long rectangle. Drizzle with 1/3 of the oil/flour mixture, and spread it out on the entire dough. Sprinly 1/2 tsp salt and 1/3 of your chopped scallions. Roll dough into a cylinder. Coil the cylinder into a flat spiral (like a snail shell), and then flatten the spiral with a rolling pin into about a 9-inch circle so its nice and thin. Repeat with the two other doughs. To cook, raise the heat on your pan, add your first round dough to the pan, cook for 1 to 2 minutes, or until the bottom is golden brown, flip, and let that side get golden brown as well. Remove from heat. Add 2 TBSP vegetable oil to the pan for each dough when you cook them. Eat warm, and enjoy!