What’s Available

This week we have baby lettuce, baby kale, spinach, baby arugula, baby bok choi, pea shoots, mesclun mix, green curly kale, lacinato kale, rainbow chard, red potatoes, yellow potatoes, garlic, red and yellow onions, red and green cabbage, fennel, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, sweet peppers, jalapeno peppers, husk cherries, leeks, acorn squash, butternut squash, spaghetti squash, red beets, golden beets, and carrots!

When we hit the fields for harvest, we load full bins on a giant pallet on the front of the tractor, ready to bring baby lettuce, red cabbage, carrots, and fennel to the wash station, photo by Adam Ford

When we hit the fields for harvest, we load full bins on a giant pallet on the front of the tractor, ready to bring baby lettuce, red cabbage, carrots, and fennel to the wash station, photo by Adam Ford



Bulk Buying Opportunities!


If you are interested in any items when I list them, send me an email and I will get them packed up for you to pick up when you pick up your share. Bulk availability comes and goes, so if you are planning on doing preserving, don’t wait: they get spoken for quickly. This now includes our CBD hemp. Since the hemp pricing is so different from vegetable we have chosen to keep our CSA as a veggie CSA, but if you are interested in CBD hemp, we are offering CSA members wholesale pricing, which are listed below.



  • jalapenos: $6 per pound or $20 for 4 pounds

  • rainbow chard: $25 for 10 bunches or $40 for 20 bunches *we use this like spinach, freeze in small batches for winter quiches, omelettes, pasta dishes, etc*

  • green curly kale: $25 for 10 bunches or $40 for 20 bunches *we use this like spinach, freeze in small batches for winter quiches, omelettes, pasta dishes, etc*

  • lacinato kale: $25 for 10 bunches or $40 for 20 bunches *we use this like spinach, freeze in small batches for winter quiches, omelettes, pasta dishes, etc*

  • elderberries: $60 for 10 pound bag of frozen berries (available fresh, not frozen upon request, and this is the last we will have fresh ones)

  • cabbage: $15 for 10 pounds

  • carrots: $20 for 10 pounds

  • garlic: $12 per pound we have both seed and table garlic available

  • CBD hemp flowers, premium grade: $50/half ounce, $80/ounce. Dried, trimmed and cured flowers, smokable quality.

  • CBD hemp flowers, processing grade: $40/ounce. Dried CBD leaves and flowers for making oil infusion or tincture.

  • Fresh CBD flowers: $10/ounce. Intensely aromatic fresh flowers



bunched carrots in the field before washing in the wash station, photo by Adam Ford

bunched carrots in the field before washing in the wash station, photo by Adam Ford



CSA Details


You can pick up your share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out.) Walk into the barn, check off your name on the right, and turn left to find all your veggies in the cooler.  You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. You can pick up your share at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market on the Okemo Mountain School Lawn between 4 pm and 6:30 pm. Please do not come before 4 pm: The market has challenging neighbors and the entire market’s permit will be revoked if products leave the market before 4 pm. Important note: For the rest of the summer season, the Ludlow Market ends at 6:30 pm due to the dwindling day light. Sorry for that inconvenience!

This is the last week of the Ludlow Farmers’ Market. If you normally pick up at the Ludlow Farmers’ Market, you can pick up your items for the remaining two weeks of pickups (after this week) 3 ways: Pickup at the farm from 8 am to 7 pm on Thursdays and Fridays, pick up at the Rutland Farmers’ Market from 9 am to 2 pm on Saturdays, or fill out an online form each week that will be available with each newsletter, selecting exactly what veggies you want, that we will pack up and deliver to Ludlow on Fridays. More details next week, we just wanted to give you the heads up that you CAN get your last two weeks delivered to Ludlow.

We love how well these tarps suppress weeds and protect soil from erosion in between plantings, but they are a nice place for voles to hide and take up residence… Echo is working hard keeping those numbers down, what a great dog! photo by Adam Ford

We love how well these tarps suppress weeds and protect soil from erosion in between plantings, but they are a nice place for voles to hide and take up residence… Echo is working hard keeping those numbers down, what a great dog! photo by Adam Ford



Farm News

The hemp harvest was huge, but is essentially behind us for the season, which is a sweet relief because we need to start tackling our bulk storage veggie harvest for the season.So many of this year’s storage veggies look awesome. We are especially excited about the storage kohlrabi we grew this year. They aren’t ready yet, but they are use, most without blemishes, and they are sweet, crunchy, and taste like melons. They are a real treat in the winter. The celeriac finally looks good, bigger than we usually grow, and similarly we will be able to have fennel in storage as well. It’s nice to have these aromatic, flavors alongside the staples of our winter storage beets, carrots, potatoes, leeks, onions, garlic, winter squash, cabbage, napa, and Gilfetaher turnips. I think my favorite veggie to bulk harvest and store are beets. We hand pull each beet and chop each top off, sorting them into “farmer” quality and resale quality, and I love getting to handle each beet. Whatever bulk veggie we are harvesting, we spend hours on our hands and knees, often in the cool, damp dirt, doing very repetative motions. I tend to write about this every year, but I love the simplicity of those lengthy, repetative jobs because it allows my mind to be more still and aware of my surroundings. As daunting as fall farm work can be, the reality is that my office is outside, next to trees, listening to the birds of the season, hearing the crunchy leave whip around the edges of the field, watching the dogs hunt for pesky field rodents, smelling the soil, not calculating how to make transitions between farm projects more efficient, but just enjoying the rhythm of the same work for hours. Bring on the beet harvest.

Adam scored an awesome shot of a very busy high tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

Adam scored an awesome shot of a very busy high tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

This picture had so much going on in here, I thought it would be fun to describe in more detail than a normal caption. First, you may notice that the foreground is planted to baby lettuce heads. We plant the bottom 30 feet of our unheated tunnels to a crop that we will harvest once, early in the winter, before we have multiple nights hitting the -20s or below. Our tunnels drop 8 feet in height over 148 feet in length of tunnel, so the bottom 30 feet tend to get especially cold as the cold air sinks and stays at the bottom. We have learned over the years, that the bottoms of tunnels die from the excess cold, so we plant the bottom 30 feet to something we will harvest early and then replant for new growth later in the winter after that very cold January/February window. These lettuces you see will be the first to harvest after we move indoors from all the field lettuces.

Down the middle of the picture is an irrigation line (yellow to blue) that is attached to white and black risers. These water in the direct seeded crops that are put above the lettuce transplants.

The big black barrel farther back in the photo is on an axis, and we roll it over a bed before seeding so we can get an even seed bed for optimal seed to soil contact. We cannot afford to have poor germination rates in a tunnel, because that crop is seeded once and then harvested multiple times over the winter. A bad stand of greens would be a huge loss in yield, so we take extra steps like creating that perfect compaction for seed to soil contact to keep germination rates high.

Way up top you will see a walk behind tractor. We finally got a new machine this year so we wouldn’t have to keep battling the $100 machine we scored on Craigslist years ago when our farm budget was much, much smaller. This new walk behind tractor has a power harrow on it so we no longer need to beet up our soil as much with a walk behind tiller. So far, we love the new machine, and feel like it was the right investment to prioritize our soils.

Dangling frmo the top of the picture are rolled up yellow twine trellises that used to hold up tomato plants. After we remove tomatoes for the season, we roll each twine up to kee pthem out of the way of winter greens’ production.

You will also see the very last cherry tomato plant that were in the tunnel until the very end. That’s a good depiction of how we move out plants in stages to optimize harvesting them as long as we can while still getting winter greens in on time.

And then waaaaaay in the back of the picture, you can see the whole team harvesting in the field behind the tunnels.

Same tunnel, but the other picture missed the other essential tool. This state of the art dump truck is a fantastic way to keep a toddler busy if you are transplanting or setting up irrigation, photo by Adam Ford

Same tunnel, but the other picture missed the other essential tool. This state of the art dump truck is a fantastic way to keep a toddler busy if you are transplanting or setting up irrigation, photo by Adam Ford

Once of these days we will just have to redirect all our time into building the end walls on the third tunnel to get it covered before winter. Really don’t know where all the time goes… we thought this new tunnel would be done by the end of July!


The whole crew getting in the last of the CBD hemp, photo by Adam Ford

The whole crew getting in the last of the CBD hemp, photo by Adam Ford

Hope you have a beautiful week and some time to enjoy these days of sunshine!

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, the Sams, Cindy, Taylor, Dan, and Grace

Curried Spaghetti Squash and Kale Soup

This soup can be made with any squash variety. I made a curried spaghetti squash dish and then decided to use the leftovers as the base for this soup!

1 spaghetti squash

1 bunch lacinato kale

2 quarts broth (chicken, veggie, beef, coconut, whatever)

salt and pepper

3 tsp curry powder

1 tsp cumin

2 tsp maple syrup

2 onions, finely chopped

1 fennel bulb (optional)

3-4 garlic cloves, crushed

2 TBSP olive oil

Preheat oven to 450. Cut spaghetti squash in half, scoop out the seeds, Put it cut side down on a baking sheet with edges, add water to the pan. Bake the spaghetti squash at 450 until you can pierce the fruit with a fork (about 20 minutes depending on the size of your oven.) Meanwhile, in a pot saute the onions, fennel, and garlic in the olive oil until translucent. When the spagetti squash is done, scoop the flesh into the pot, add the broth, cumin, curry, maple syrup, salt, and pepper. Blend until smooth. Add more broth if you want a thinner soup. Chop the lacinto kale into the thinnest ribbons and stir into hot soup. Serve and enjoy!