WHAT'S AVAILABLE

This week you can choose from new red potatoes, new yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, beets with greens, baby arugula, basil, zucchini, shiitake mushrooms, microgreens, garlic, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, french filet green beans, cilantro, husk cherries, parsley, cabbage, mini cabbage, red and yellow onions, elderberries, delicata squash, acorn squash, butternut squash, spaghetti squash, and leeks! (This is likely the last week of fresh elderberries, though we will have them available frozen in bulk for a bit.) 

 Shiitake log, photo by Adam Ford

Shiitake log, photo by Adam Ford

Bulk Availability

Send me an email if you want any of the items below in bulk for preserving. These are wholesale prices we make available to CSA members and their friends a family.

  • zucchini for $1.50 per pound  
  • basil for $12 per pound
  • garlic for $10 per pound
  • beets for $2 per pound
  • elderberries for $6 per pound
  • husk cherries for $6 per pound
  • cabbage for $1.50 per pound
  • french filet green beans for $5.50 per pound
  • roma tomatoes for $2.50 per pound 
  • shiitake mushrooms for $12 per pound
 This picture of pea shoots kind of looks like a well organize pea shoot choir singing to the rest of the green house, photo by Adam Ford

This picture of pea shoots kind of looks like a well organize pea shoot choir singing to the rest of the green house, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. If you are new to coming to the farm, use "680 Shunpike Road, Shrewsbury VT 05738" to get to our driveway.  You can pick up your share from the Ludlow Farmers' Market on Fridays from 4 pm to 7 pm on the front lawn of the Okemo Mountain School right on Route 103, just south of down town. (The permit at the market does not allow us to let veggies leave the market before 4pm, so please try not to come early.) You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm, right downtown by the Walmart parking lot.

 Peter and Mikayla harvesting zukes, photo by Adam Ford

Peter and Mikayla harvesting zukes, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

This week the team finished transplanting out the last big outdoor seeding of lettuce. All the rest of the lettuce plantings will go into a high tunnel for winter production. We also seeded the bulk of the winter spinach transplants. It's hard to believe when we are seeding in a hot, hot greenhouse, excited to go swimming after work that the seeds we are planting will be growing in a cold, cold tunnel in the winter, with 3 layers of fabric over them to keep them alive! 

 Napa cabbage transplants... get ready to make your kimchi this fall! photo by Adam Ford

Napa cabbage transplants... get ready to make your kimchi this fall! photo by Adam Ford

We have started the earliest harvest of winter squash! I usually associate the start of that harvest with some fall-feeling weather, so this feels early, but it may be right on time. My favorite way to have squash when it is warm like this is to roast a delicata, cut it into small cubes, and refrigerate. Then I add some of those chunks onto a bright green salad each time to add some sweet, textural treats to my late summer salads. 

 red cabbage leaf, photo by Adam Ford

red cabbage leaf, photo by Adam Ford

Eventually I will make it through our whole team with farmer profiles, so this week, I introduce Morgan! Morgan has been working with us for over a year now. She lives and works locally on a farm that produces many things, but mostly maple syrup and blueberries. Morgan has been splitting her time there for 2 days and working at Evening Song Farm 4 days a week. Not only does she work 6-day farm weeks between her two jobs, but she is also a full time college student. Morgan's goal setting and work/college balance is truly impressive to me. I am blown away how she can do so well at all those responsibilities at once. 

 curing onions, photo by Adam Ford

curing onions, photo by Adam Ford

Morgan is originally from Pennsylvania, where she has had several types of jobs, but most recently working on large farms producing green beans and potatoes. .... like, really, really big farms, where she drove a combine to harvest endless acres of green beans. I remember the day when we wanted to start training Morgan into tractor driving, and we asked if she had any tractor driving experience, and she implied not really. She is correct that driving tractors and combines are different, but when I learned that was her previous job, I realized she would learn tractor driving in no time. Morgan is generally humble with her hidden skills, and I find it wildly cool that as a young 20-something woman she was driving a combine.... This is especially rare in a field where the average age of farmers is 65, and women farmers are still in the minority. While working on these larger farms, Morgan felt like there may be other or better ways to be producing food for humans and the earth, and so she started looking for smaller scale production to continue developing her knowledge of farming, which is what originally brought her to Vermont. Eventually Morgan thinks she will run some type of farm enterprise, and with experience in large scale farming, small scale organic vegetable production, blueberry cultivation, goat milking, sheep management, chicken management, tunnel production, direct marketing, sugar making, and woods work she may take her skills and passions in any direction. 

 Morgan thinking about how cool she is, photo by Adam Ford

Morgan thinking about how cool she is, photo by Adam Ford

Morgan has taken on lots of leadership roles around here: tractor driving, running markets, packing wholesale orders, and generally being an extra brain to organize jobs done well, not let things fall through the cracks, know where things are harvested from and how, and the ability to see how improvements can be made around here. We love when people want to throw their brain into this job that is mostly physically demanding, thanks, Morgan!

 Morgan harvesting shiitakes, photo by Adam Ford

Morgan harvesting shiitakes, photo by Adam Ford

One of the most inspiring parts of working with Morgan is her dedication to sensible modes of transportation. She and her teammate, Peter, have been biking to work for most of the season, which means they get up an hour earlier than if they were to drive here, and brave whatever the weather has been, even traveling for a chunk on Route 103, and then triumphantly biking up our long, steep road to use their bikes rather than a car. (I used to bike as my main source of transportation, but that was when I lived in the flat, flat midwest.. Shunpike Road is a doozy.) She just got rid of her car permanently, and now they rely completely on bikes. Rock stars. 

 this is a generic image of a combine from machinefinder.com in case you aren't sure how wild they look.. Morgan was driving one that harvested green beans though, not grains.... now she is on a bike:)

this is a generic image of a combine from machinefinder.com in case you aren't sure how wild they look.. Morgan was driving one that harvested green beans though, not grains.... now she is on a bike:)

Morgan and Peter will eventually be leaving the Vermont region to explore agriculture and adventures in other areas before possibly setting up shop in Pennsylvania. This little neighborhood will surely miss them both when that happens. But for now, it's been such a treat to have them both as part of the team. (Stay tuned for Peter's profile in a future newsletter.)

Have a great week!

-The ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Morgan, Peter, Sam, and Mikayla

Summer Spaghetti Squash

 image from foodnetwork.com

image from foodnetwork.com

1 spaghetti squash

1 bunch cilantro, chopped

1 leek, sliced thin (including green part)

3-4 cloves garlic, smashed

1/2 bag pea shoots, chopped

1/2 cup peanut butter

1/4 cup tamari

2 TBSP maple syrup

3 TBSP rice vinegar

Cut squash in half and scoop out the seeds. Place face down on a baking tray and bake at 400 degrees until you can pierce the skin with a fork. Remove from the oven and let cool. Meanwhile, Mix together the peanut butter, tamari, maple syrup, rice vinegar, garlic, and leeks. When the squash is cool enough to handle, scoop out the flesh into a bowl. Toss the dressing with the squash noodles. Add the cilantro and pea shoots when you are ready to serve. Enjoy!