What’s Available

This week you can choose from red potatoes, yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, red beets, golden beets, baby arugula, mesclun mix, baby lettuce, basil, zucchini, shiitake mushrooms, garlic, tomatoes, green tomatoes, husk cherries, parsley, cabbage, red and yellow onions, spaghetti squash, butternut squash, acorn squash, delicata squash, red sweet peppers, and leeks! 

 Morgan washing potatoes with the root washer, photo by Adam Ford

Morgan washing potatoes with the root washer, photo by Adam Ford

Bulk Availability

Send me an email if you want any of the items below in bulk for preserving. These are wholesale prices we make available to CSA members and their friends a family.

  • zucchini for $1.50 per pound  

  • basil for $12 per pound (last week)

  • garlic for $10 per pound

  • beets for $2 per pound

  • frozen elderberries for $60 for 10 pound bag)

  • husk cherries for $6 per pound

  • cabbage for $1.50 per pound

  • shiitake mushrooms for $12 per pound

 cilantro babies waiting to be transplanted, photo by Adam Ford

cilantro babies waiting to be transplanted, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. If you are new to coming to the farm, use "680 Shunpike Road, Shrewsbury VT 05738" to get to our driveway.  You can pick up your share from the Ludlow Farmers' Market on Fridays from 4 pm to 7 pm on the front lawn of the Okemo Mountain School right on Route 103, just south of down town. (The permit at the market does not allow us to let veggies leave the market before 4pm, so please try not to come early.) You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm, right downtown by the Walmart parking lot.

 Ryan and I walking around the dying squash vines to discuss the harvest plans, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan and I walking around the dying squash vines to discuss the harvest plans, photo by Adam Ford


Farm News

What do farmers do on a cold, rainy fall day? We start by fantasizing about indoor jobs and wondering why we chose farming :) But in all seriousness, we are lucky at our farm, that even though there are plenty of times that we need to work in all types of weather, no matter how unpleasant, that we are also diversified enough that on some of the worst weather days we can focus on “indoor” work. So today, Tuesday we were removing more old tomato plants from the high tunnel, transforming those summer beds, and transplanting more winter greens. We can also do things like cleaning up the onions that have cured and are ready for sale. Our team is a hard core group of people, but we all still appreciate being out of the rain and wind.

 Newly planted kale plants for winter harvest complimented by a board of traps to protect the seedlings from rodents while they are small, photo by Adam Ford

Newly planted kale plants for winter harvest complimented by a board of traps to protect the seedlings from rodents while they are small, photo by Adam Ford

Most of the winter squash harvest is in, cleaned, and stored for the season, except for the butternut. Hopefully we will get to that in the next few days. We have just started the big fall beet harvest, and as usual our biggest challenge is voles in the field. As we do our big bulk harvest, we always have to toss a lot of damaged beets into bins to feed to the goats.

 This is a garland made from dried tomatillo wrappers… this is how a farmer may decorate their kitchen, garland courtesy of Maya Zelkin, photo by Adam Ford

This is a garland made from dried tomatillo wrappers… this is how a farmer may decorate their kitchen, garland courtesy of Maya Zelkin, photo by Adam Ford

We are grateful and impressed that one of our varieties of peppers decided to start producing at the very end of the summer. It seemed like it was going to be a complete flop this year, but rather they are just a disappointment. This fall we are also growing red and green Chinese cabbage, which is new to our offerings, and I am excited we finally worked them in to our plantings. They will be ready in a couple weeks, and the bonus of them, is that they also store well in the winter like the more popular cabbage. They amaze me how fast they grow.

One of my favorite parts about this time of year is that weeds, like all other plants, have really slowed in their growth, so they are significantly more manageable these days.

 Please enjoy this series of 3 photos by Adam: When I look up close at plants, I am convinced that is where Dr. Seuss got much of his inspiration.

Please enjoy this series of 3 photos by Adam: When I look up close at plants, I am convinced that is where Dr. Seuss got much of his inspiration.

grass.jpg
dr. seuss.jpg

I am starting to make warmer, heartier items in our kitchen these days with the shift in the weather, like soups in the slow cooker, and squash everything. If you haven’t already, acorn squash is a fun squash to stuff because of its shape.

Have a great week!

- The ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Morgan, Peter, Morgan, Mikayla, and Taylor


Herb Roasted Acorn Squash

 image from spachethespatula.com

image from spachethespatula.com

  • 2 small acorn squash (or a large one)

  • 1/3 cup grated parmesan

  • 1/2 tsp sage

  • 1/2 tsp rosemary

  • 1 TBSP olive oil

  • 1/2 tsp garlic poweder

  • salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cut squash in half and remove seeds. Slice int 1/2 inch think slices. Toss all the ingredients together in a bowl to coat evenly. Lay on a baking pan. Bake for about 20 minutes, until the cheese is a light brown.