What’s Available

This week you can choose from red potatoes, yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, red beets, golden beets, baby arugula, mesclun mix, basil, zucchini, shiitake mushrooms, microgreens, garlic, tomatoes, cilantro, husk cherries, parsley, cabbage, red and yellow onions, spaghetti squash, butternut squash, acorn squash, delicata squash, and leeks! 

The beet bunches probably won’t have greens this week, as the leaf miner pressure has really done a number on them. Sorry!

 some of the golden beets still have beautiful greens, photo by Adam Ford

some of the golden beets still have beautiful greens, photo by Adam Ford

Bulk Availability

Send me an email if you want any of the items below in bulk for preserving. These are wholesale prices we make available to CSA members and their friends a family.

  • zucchini for $1.50 per pound  

  • basil for $12 per pound

  • garlic for $10 per pound

  • beets for $2 per pound

  • frozen elderberries for $6 per pound

  • husk cherries for $6 per pound

  • cabbage for $1.50 per pound

  • shiitake mushrooms for $12 per pound

 close up of a kale leaf, I love those greens! photo by Adam Ford

close up of a kale leaf, I love those greens! photo by Adam Ford


CSA Details

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. If you are new to coming to the farm, use "680 Shunpike Road, Shrewsbury VT 05738" to get to our driveway.  You can pick up your share from the Ludlow Farmers' Market on Fridays from 4 pm to 7 pm on the front lawn of the Okemo Mountain School right on Route 103, just south of down town. (The permit at the market does not allow us to let veggies leave the market before 4pm, so please try not to come early.) You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm, right downtown by the Walmart parking lot.

 harvested fingerlings, photo by Adam Ford

harvested fingerlings, photo by Adam Ford

Community Event!

This Sunday, September 23rd, there will be a harvest festival at the Vermont Farmers’ Food Center at 3pm. There will be a cash bar, and delicious food featuring many local farms, such as Evening Song Farm potatoes, kale, basil, baby lettuce, and beets. If you are interested, use this link to buy a ticket: http://www.vermontfarmersfoodcenter.org/harvest_festival_2018 This is an annual fundraiser that supports the work of the Food Center. The Food Center has been an incredible community effort over the last several years, and there is still so much work it can branch out into with the support of the community. Not only will this event be fun and delicious, but it supports great work in Rutland that is the foundation for many initiatives, such as the Farmacy Project, (providing affordable, local veggies to folks whose health would benefit from veggie access), community gardens, a future food aggregation center (which will undoubtedly be an energizer to the Rutland economy), an educational greenhouse, and so much more, as found on their website. If you are able, go eat a delicious meal that blends many of the area farms’ food together in a celebration of the season, and celebrates the work in this region’s agricultural sector.

 those empty looking beds are the fall plantings of lettuce, meslcun, and arugula, just seeded and germinating, photo by Adam Ford

those empty looking beds are the fall plantings of lettuce, meslcun, and arugula, just seeded and germinating, photo by Adam Ford


Farm News

The first winter greens are being transplanted into the tunnel this week… the same week Ryan direct seeded the last round of arugula and mesclun mix in the fields outside. We pulled out a few rows of old tomatoes and basil to make way for winter crops. All the onions have been pulled in from field curing, and are now finishing that process in the propagation house. Ryan got the last of the winter cover crops seeded this week., and he re-baited the deer fence to protect our fall field greens. We seeded dozens of trays of spinach seedlings to sell to other winter growers later in October. For the past several years we have been doing that, knowing how easy it is to be so busy this time of year that you forget to seed your winter greens. It’s a win-win for everyone: an extra income generator for our farm, but also a big save for farms that were planning to grow winter greens, but didn’t get around to starting them on time.

 Ah! These trees are hinting at the end of summer! photo by Adam Ford

Ah! These trees are hinting at the end of summer! photo by Adam Ford

I love the extension of summer with these warm temperatures. The plants are less responsive to the warm weather than they are to the shorter hours of day light this time of year. I always hope a warm late summer would correlate to more summer crops ripening on their way out, like tomatoes and eggplant. But even though those types of crops are frost sensitive, they are even more photosensitive. So they are all winding down with the earlier evenings and later mornings.

 old broccoli plants provide food for pollinators, photo by Adam Ford

old broccoli plants provide food for pollinators, photo by Adam Ford

The next few weeks will be characterized by lots of summer plants being removed from the high tunnels, and lots of transplanting of winter greens into the high tunnels, as well as continued harvests of fall type veggies. Some folks have asked us about the fall and winter CSA. Now is a great time to sign up for the fall share: https://www.eveningsongcsa.com/csa-fall-share. Stay tuned for details about the winter share. We also partner with the Northeast Organic Farming Association to offer income shared CSA shares. You can sign up for a half price CSA share here if you qualify: https://nofavt.org/farmshare/applicant. If you sign up with NOFA, be sure to also sign up on our website.

 The toddler is taller than the barn, photo by Adam Ford

The toddler is taller than the barn, photo by Adam Ford

Have a great week!

-The ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Morgan, Mikayla, Peter, Sam, and Taylor

Roasted Delicata over Rice with Chimichurri

 image from eatingwell.com

image from eatingwell.com

We have been eating this meal in all sorts of variations these days. The essentials are rice with roasted veggies and a chimichurri sauce. Squash not your thing? Roast anything!

1 delicata squash, cut lengthwise, remove the seeds, and then cut into thin slices (keep skin on)

1 medium red onion, sliced thin

10 cloves of garlic, 6 cloves sliced thickly

salt and pepper

olive oil

1 TBSP olive oil

Chimichurri:

1 bunch of cilantro

1 bunch of parsley

5 basil tops

1/3 cup olive oil

1/4 cup lime juice

1 TBSP lemon juice

1 tsp salt

1 TBSP maple syrup

Toss the sliced delicata, red onion, and 6 cloves of garlic with olive oil, salt and pepper. Bake about 30 minutes at 400. Remove from the heat when they have lightly browned. Then toss with 1 TBSP maple syrup. Meanwhile, mix all the ingredients for the chimichurri together and blend until smooth, using a food processor or blender. (Add extra olive oil or lemon juice if more liquid is needed to make it smooth. Serve the squash over rice and finish with chimichurri on each bite!