What’s Available

This week you can choose from red potatoes, yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, beets with greens, baby arugula, mesclun mix, basil, zucchini, shiitake mushrooms, microgreens, garlic, tomatoes, cilantro, husk cherries, parsley, cabbage, mini cabbage, red and yellow onions, spaghetti squash, butternut squash, acorn squash, delicata squash, and leeks! 

 fall lettuce plantings, photo by Adam Ford

fall lettuce plantings, photo by Adam Ford

Bulk Availability

Send me an email if you want any of the items below in bulk for preserving. These are wholesale prices we make available to CSA members and their friends a family.

  • zucchini for $1.50 per pound  

  • basil for $12 per pound

  • garlic for $10 per pound

  • beets for $2 per pound

  • elderberries for $6 per pound

  • husk cherries for $6 per pound

  • cabbage for $1.50 per pound

  • french filet green beans for $5.50 per pound

  • roma tomatoes for $2.50 per pound 

  • shiitake mushrooms for $12 per pound

 fall carrots on the left, fall red cabbage in the middle, fall green cabbage to the right, and cover cropped area far right, photo by Adam Ford

fall carrots on the left, fall red cabbage in the middle, fall green cabbage to the right, and cover cropped area far right, photo by Adam Ford


CSA Details

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. If you are new to coming to the farm, use "680 Shunpike Road, Shrewsbury VT 05738" to get to our driveway.  You can pick up your share from the Ludlow Farmers' Market on Fridays from 4 pm to 7 pm on the front lawn of the Okemo Mountain School right on Route 103, just south of down town. (The permit at the market does not allow us to let veggies leave the market before 4pm, so please try not to come early.) You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm, right downtown by the Walmart parking lot.

 Carrot forest, photo by Adam Ford

Carrot forest, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

This week I am thinking of the farmers along the southern eastern seaboard who are bracing for Hurricane Florence. With the volume of rain that is predicted, there will definitely be farms who will be permanently devastated. Sometimes I wish that instead of hustling to get our own farm ready for the large fall harvest and plantings for winter growing, that I could head up a large traveling band of volunteers who would travel to places bracing for a hurricane, and help those farms get ready: move animals, feed, and equipment to safer places, fill backup water holdings for animals, harvest anything that is close to ready that would be knocked down from rain or wind, rip plastic off of greenhouses in hopes the structure can survive the storm (knowing that leaving the plastic on will ensure its demise), get backup generators ready, and who knows whatever specific needs each farm has. And then of course, be able to loop back around to affected farms to help them with the long clean up. There are many reasons that folks don’t evacuate even during mandatory evacuations, and sometimes farmers are those people, especially if they have animals they can’t move to safety. Here’s to thoughts of Florence losing her steam, and having our southern neighbors fare as well as they can this week.

 This is a row of fall harvested rutabaga that is row covered to exclude the cabbage maggot which damages the main root of the rutabaga, photo by Adam Ford

This is a row of fall harvested rutabaga that is row covered to exclude the cabbage maggot which damages the main root of the rutabaga, photo by Adam Ford

In our neck of the woods, it has been wetter lately, but that’s been ok. We have a beautiful stand of fall cover crops emerging and growing nicely with the moisture. The team has been able to use some of the rainy time preparing the tunnels for summer to winter transition: pulling out the dead cucumber plants, and readying beds for the seedings and transplantings of winter greens. Ryan finished up the winter tunnel map this week, and as I glance over his spread sheets, it looks like we will get to enjoy some of our standard greens this winter: mesclun, spinach, kale, bok choi, lettuce, arugula, cilantro, parley… It looks like at least for this fall, we will continue to have one of our tunnels unheated. We have too much going on at the farm to try and pull off the enormous project of installing subsurface hot water lines in the other tunnel the way Ryan heroically did in the spring. If we choose to add heat to our other tunnel, it won’t be until next spring.

 cover crop just emerging from the field, photo by Adam Ford

cover crop just emerging from the field, photo by Adam Ford

All the onions are pulled from the field, curing in the propagation house for winter storage. Next up, we will bring in the shallots. Most other fall crops are a ways away from harvest, but when they are all ready, they all come on at once!

 onions waiting to be taken in after field curing, photo by Adam Ford

onions waiting to be taken in after field curing, photo by Adam Ford

Next week we will continue to transition the tunnels, pulling out old tomato plants to make way for all the baby seedlings for winter greens. We do one bed at a time to try to drag out our tomato availability as long as possible. Though some of them have been growing for an especially long time since we put them in back in April in the heated tunnel!

 This is the last outdoor planting of lettuce for the 2018 season, photo by Adam Ford

This is the last outdoor planting of lettuce for the 2018 season, photo by Adam Ford

Have a great week!

ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Mikayla, Peter, Morgan, Sam, Taylor


Zucchini Boats

I cannot believe I forgot to put a zucchini boat recipe up this summer! We love making these and always enjoy variations on a good theme. Each time I make zucchini boats, I choose a different flavor idea: taco boats, greek boats, middle eastern boats, midwestern boats, breakfast boats, pizza boats. This recipe is the pizza-flavored boat. (For vegetarians, you can coarsely pulse up chickpeas to replace the ground meat, and add an extra TBSP of olive oil.)

 image from budgetbytes.com

image from budgetbytes.com

3 medium zucchini

1 pound of tomatoes

1 TBSP olive oil

1 pound ground meat

1 medium onion, finely chopped

3-4 cloves garlic, smashed

1 pint shiitake mushrooms, finely chopped

1 bunch parsley, finely chopped

1/2 bag basil, finely chopped

salt and pepper

1 TBSP oregano

1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella

1/2 cup shredded parmesan

1/4 cup bread crumbs

2 eggs

Preheat oven to 375. Slice Zucchini lengthwise, and scoop out the inside to make a boat. Put the scooped out part of the zucchini in a baking tray lined with olive oil and bake about 15-20 minutes. Drain water from the tray after they cool. Meanwhile in a pan, cook ground meat with the onion and garlic. Add the scooped out zucchini, mushrooms, 1/3 of the tomatoes, oregano, salt and pepper, and olive oil and cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add basil, parsley, bread crumbs, eggs, 1/4 cup parmesan, and 1/2 cup mozzarella, and mix well. In a deep baking tray, lay out 6 empty zucchini boats. Divide the filling between them. (If there is extra filling, you can just bake it, it’s delicious.) Slice your remaining tomatoes over the zucchini boats, and then top the whole dish with the remaining 1/4 cup parmesan and 1 cup mozzarella. Bake until top is golden brown. Enjoy!