What's Available

This week you can choose from new red potatoes, new yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, beets with greens, baby arugula, basil, zucchini, shiitake mushrooms, microgreens, garlic, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, carrots, french filet green beans, cilantro, husk cherries, parsley, cabbage, kohlrabi, mini cabbage, red and yellow onions, elderberries, and leeks!  

 leeks, photo by Adam Ford

leeks, photo by Adam Ford

Bulk Availability

Send me an email if you want any of the items below in bulk for preserving. These are wholesale prices we make available to CSA members and their friends a family.

  • zucchini for $1.50 per pound  
  • basil for $12 per pound
  • garlic for $10 per pound
  • beets for $2 per pound
  • elderberries for $6 per pound
  • husk cherries for $6 per pound
  • beets for $2 per pound
  • cabbage for $1.50 per pound
  • french filet green beans for $5.50 per pound
  • roma tomatoes for $2.50 per pound 
  • shiitake mushrooms for $12 per pound
 frozen elderberries about to be de-stemmed, photo by Adam Ford

frozen elderberries about to be de-stemmed, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. If you are new to coming to the farm, use "680 Shunpike Road, Shrewsbury VT 05738" to get to our driveway.  You can pick up your share from the Ludlow Farmers' Market on Fridays from 4 pm to 7 pm on the front lawn of the Okemo Mountain School right on Route 103, just south of down town. (The permit at the market does not allow us to let veggies leave the market before 4pm, so please try not to come early.) You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm, right downtown by the Walmart parking lot.

 It's always exciting to see a monarch, photo by Adam Ford

It's always exciting to see a monarch, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

Yesterday almost slipped by without me realizing it was our Irene-aversary. Every year is palpably farther away from the trauma we felt that day, trying to save some of our bigger equipment before having to evacuate our animals and ourselves. Even though it is only 7 years ago now, it can often seem like a little stumble on our path towards building a farm in Shrewsbury, though I certainly would not be able to relate to that minimization even a couple years ago. Our road to recovery from losing our first location to that storm was messy and exhausting, and it keeps us present and grateful in our current location, and especially grateful for being able to continue the work of farming.

 If that's not the most tenacious lettuce seedling, I don't know what is... This must be a transplant that fell out of the tray in our gravel tractor path, and decided it could grow in gravel anyway... I want to eat that lettuce when it's grown up, it seems to have some magical powers, photo by Adam Ford

If that's not the most tenacious lettuce seedling, I don't know what is... This must be a transplant that fell out of the tray in our gravel tractor path, and decided it could grow in gravel anyway... I want to eat that lettuce when it's grown up, it seems to have some magical powers, photo by Adam Ford

Each year on the anniversary of the storm, we take some time for stillness to offer kindness to ourselves and appreciation for the support of our community that helped us through that disaster. This year I felt more in touch with what brought me to farming in the first place, and why I still find myself doing this work. Farming is just one form of expression of the hopefulness I feel for the world that has been brewing my entire conscious life. Somehow from a young age, I could tell the world was full of suffering, and I wanted to figure out how to participate in some of its healing, and my easiest pursuit started with a passion for environmentalism. By the time I left college, I felt like the urgency of climate change demanded that I do work that was actively moving us away from systems of production that accelerated the damage to our environment.

 Soraya on her way to join me with wholesale deliveries, photo by Adam Ford

Soraya on her way to join me with wholesale deliveries, photo by Adam Ford

Even though I dragged Ryan into this profession of farming, I am not the skilled farmer that Ryan is: he brings a curiosity, knowledge, and attention to detail that impresses me all the time. My role here has always been the work horse who pushes for more, asking our farm to continue to be better at reaching our goals of a healthier earth. Nearly a decade into this adventure, and I am feeling ready to take on a new project to add to the work of this farm, as I sat in stillness on our Irene-aversary.  In this world, it's rare to get to have a job you love. And 7 years out from the storm I was sitting with the reality that we were given the rare opportunity to keep farming after a climate disaster, so what do I pay forward for that gift? 

 Morgan and Peter taking a break to stretch while harvesting greens... I learned at a farming conference years ago from a farmer many decads my senior, that if I wanted to farm into my future that we should reach up for one minute of every hour of bent over work, photo by Adam Ford

Morgan and Peter taking a break to stretch while harvesting greens... I learned at a farming conference years ago from a farmer many decads my senior, that if I wanted to farm into my future that we should reach up for one minute of every hour of bent over work, photo by Adam Ford

This week Ryan got the large round of cover crop seeded for the fall. The team continues to transplant out fall crops. The biggest job these days is harvesting, de-stemming, and freezing elderberries for future orders. Our pepper plants seriously disappoint us this year. They are the best looking pepper plants we have ever grown, except there is minimal to no fruit on them. That area of the gardens must have been too high in nitrogen for them to produce flowers. This is quite frustrating to care for something all season, and then have them flop like this.... especially when I finally went all out and planted all the hot pepper varieties of my dreams for hot sauce!

 elderberry bushes, photo by Adam Ford

elderberry bushes, photo by Adam Ford

Tomatoes and Chicken

 image from wellplated.com

image from wellplated.com

  • 1 1/4 pounds chicken breasts
  • salt and pepper
  • 3 TBSP olive oil
  • 1 small red onion, finely chopped
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 1 pound roma tomatoes, quartered
  • 2 TBSP red wine vinegar
  • 1 TBSP honey
  • 1 bunch parsley, chopped
  • 1/4 cup capers or olives (optional)

Lightly pound chicken to an even thickness. Heat the olive oil in a pan. Lay the chicken in the pan, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Let cook about 4 minutes, until lightly browned. Flip and cook for another 4 minutes. Then keep flipping ever 2-3 minutes until the chicken is cooked through. Put the chicken on a plate and cover. Add the onion to the oil in the pan, and cook about 3 minutes, add the garlic and cook for less than a minute. Add the tomatoes, red wine vinegar, honey, some more salt and pepper, and optional capers or olives. Cook about 2 minutes, return the chicken to the pan, sprinkle with the parsley, and then serve!