What's Available

This week you can choose from yellow potatoes, new red potatoes, beets with greens, microgreens, lettuce heads, baby lettuce mix, baby arugula, baby bok choi, salad turnips, scallions, bunched green curly kale, bunched lacinato kale, bunched rainbow chard, baby chard, kohlrabi, basil, cucumbers, zucchini, summer squash, shiitake mushrooms, garlic scapes, snap peas, heirloom tomatoes, and cherry tomatoes!

 ripening cherry tomatoes on the vine, photo by Adam Ford

ripening cherry tomatoes on the vine, photo by Adam Ford

The tomatoes are just starting to roll in, so for this week, try to limit yourself to either a pint of cherry tomatoes or a pound of heirlooms so that everyone can get some this first week. In the coming weeks there will be a bounty, but the first harvest is always small. The type of peas we grow are an edible pod pea, so you can eat the whole thing. If kohlrabi is new to you, give it a shot, we LOVE it! It's got a flavor somewhere between an apple and broccoli. It's most commonly eaten raw, sliced or grate over salad or in slices with dip, but they are exceptional roasted or grilled as well. 

 peas getting plump on their vines, photo by Adam Ford

peas getting plump on their vines, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. If you are new to coming to the farm, use "680 Shunpike Road, Shrewsbury VT 05738" to get to our driveway.  You can pick up your share from the Ludlow Farmers' Market on Fridays from 4 pm to 7 pm on the front lawn of the Okemo Mountain School right on Route 103, just south of down town. You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm, right downtown by the Walmart parking lot.

 firewood for a zillion winters, photo by Adam Ford (this was a stack of about 16 cords of wood that Ryan harvested last year when we thought we were going to go the route of cord wood boiler for the tunnels. After much research and planning, we went with the pellet boiler, and now have our firewood for quite some time. All was cut, split, and stacked in one day with the help of a CSA member!

firewood for a zillion winters, photo by Adam Ford (this was a stack of about 16 cords of wood that Ryan harvested last year when we thought we were going to go the route of cord wood boiler for the tunnels. After much research and planning, we went with the pellet boiler, and now have our firewood for quite some time. All was cut, split, and stacked in one day with the help of a CSA member!

Farm News

Holy cow, it's been hot! The heat killed this week's pea shoots, and potentially next week's, but everything else is doing well, even the farmers. We were able to have the crew do our weekly greenhouse seeding in the cool of the root cellar, which was super nice. We are using the heat to hopefully jump on a bunch of weeding that needs to happen, and Ryan was able to hill the later potatoes that needed that attention. This time of year he always does a re-evaluation of the fields and where fall plantings will be put in, in case weather, weed pressure, disease, or anything else dictates a need to deviate from the original crop plan set out in the winter. We have many transplants ready and eager to go out, but with this heat, we are going to wait a little bit on them. Next week we may need to play catch up on transplants and trellising, because it's kind of awful to be in the tunnels in the weather.

 Ryan seeding the next round of fast brassicas, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan seeding the next round of fast brassicas, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan and I were super lucky to be able to take this weekend off to visit friends at the beach! Any time away from here is the greatest gift our team gives us, and they expertly held down all aspects of the farm for us to have this luxury. Special shout out to Peter and Morgan for staying at the farm and caring for all the animals, baby plants, and fruiting crops over the weekend. 

 Sky LOVES the beach.. mostly runs in and out of the waves and laughs, but he also finds time to eat sand and climb on papa, photo by Sarina Partridge

Sky LOVES the beach.. mostly runs in and out of the waves and laughs, but he also finds time to eat sand and climb on papa, photo by Sarina Partridge

Two weeks ago, we started profiling our crew members, and we will do someone new every few weeks. This week, meet Taylor!

 Taylor harvesting cukes, selfie by Taylor Morneau

Taylor harvesting cukes, selfie by Taylor Morneau

Taylor is a Wellness Advocate for doTERRA Essential Oils and certified in their AromaTouch Technique.She books treatment appointments at Right to Wellness Center in Rutland when she isn't farming or mom-ing. She joined the Evening Song Farm team this spring when we realized we needed a bit more part time help. It was a huge relief to add an extra teammate, especially since she came with so much farming experience, and leadership experience at the Rutland co-op. Her fluency of both farming and retailing produce is an awesome combination to add to the team.  

 microgreens in different stages of growth in the propagation house, photo by Adam Ford

microgreens in different stages of growth in the propagation house, photo by Adam Ford

Taylor says she is interested in farming because "growing food is essential to life. Being part of a farm crew has become one of my favorite places to be. I love food, nature and people!" She goes on to say the "teamwork of wonderful people in nature, combined with providing nourishment to the community is one of the most rewarding experiences I’ve had in a work environment." She says the most challenging part of farming is the workout, but that to her it's "more of an added bonus, not necessarily a challenge." (I can totally relate to that! Having to work these fields daily, especially walking up and down the steeper fields keeps me strong and mobile, even at 37 weeks pregnant, and huge!) We are lucky to have jobs that aren't sedentary.

 Ripe! photo by Adam Ford

Ripe! photo by Adam Ford

When asked if she sees farming in her future, Taylor says, "As a mom of three, I’m never certain what the future holds, but I’m now on my 7th season of farming and definitely open to more!" As you have heard me talk about, I love asking people the silliest thing they have done farming before they had much experience. I am always looking for those wild stories, like the time a farmer gave me a packet of broccoli seeds, he asked to to seed in a row, and I had no idea the plants need 2 feet each, so I scattered the whole packet withing about 3 feet. Whoops! At this point, Taylor has a lot of experience, she was just new to our systems, so she said the most ridiculous thing she has done here was forgetting that we drain baby bok choi in bins with drain holes, and then storing the washed bok choi in the cooler on top of a bin of dried, spun greens. I'm not gonna lie, I have done waaaaaaaay stupider things, Taylor.

 Mikayla and Sam weeding a carrot planting, photo by Adam Ford

Mikayla and Sam weeding a carrot planting, photo by Adam Ford

When asked about cooking with produce she says, "Soups, stir frys and roasted veggies are my favorite things to cook with fresh veggies. Also, salad, salad and more salad!" 

Hope you all have a great week, and get to do some swimming in this heat! That's the only thing I like about it!

 Sam and Shain bunching rainbow chard, photo by Adam Ford

Sam and Shain bunching rainbow chard, photo by Adam Ford

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Taylor, Shain, Peter, Morgan, Mikayla, and Sam

 

Kohlrabi Fries

 image from jrorganicsfarm.com

image from jrorganicsfarm.com

2 kohlrabi bulbs, peeled, and cut into strips

1 TBSP olive oil

1 tsp lemon juice

1 TBSP flour

1/4 tsp salt

1/2 tsp cumin

1/2 tsp chili powder

Toss kohlrabi with olive oil and lemon juice. Mix flour, salt, cumin, and chili powder together, then toss that mixture in with the kohlrabi. Spread on a baking sheet, and bake at 425 for 30 minutes, or when lightly browned, flipping halfway through.