beautiful mesclun waiting to be harvested for this weekend, photo by Adam Ford

beautiful mesclun waiting to be harvested for this weekend, photo by Adam Ford

What's Available

This week you can choose from yellow potatoes, carrots, baby carrots, beets, rutabaga, Gilfeather turnip, spinach, mesclun mix, baby kale, scallions, baby arugula, and pea shoots. (Scallions are half an item.) You are also welcome to choose plant starts for your garden as share items. As the season goes on we will have more vegetable starts to choose from, but for now what we have available as starts are: (in 4-packs) parsley, dill, brussels sprouts, rainbow chard, lacinato kale, green curly kale, broccoli, (and in 2-inch pots) slicing cucumbers, pickling cucumbers, sweet Italian red peppers, pablano peppers, jalapeno peppers, serrano peppers, and cayenne peppers. The 4-packs are 1 item, and the 2-inch pots are half an item. (If you choose any of the peppers or cucumbers now, they should still be protected from frost.)

 Bella's buckling... easily the cudliest of this batch, photo by Adam Ford

Bella's buckling... easily the cudliest of this batch, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your share at the farm on Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. (Veggies will be displayed in the cooler to pick out, rather than having a pre-packed bag at the farm.) You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 10 am to 2 pm. If you want your share delivered to Ludlow, use this form by 9 am on Friday to select the veggies you want for the week: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSewzn_VdO-qNORGtls6yuqaubDZ7mUtrc-UcSx1SSVvvKnWhQ/viewform?c=0&w=1. Then you can pick up your share from Four Season's Sotheby's International Realty between 2 pm and 5 pm. They are next to Java Baba's in the shopping plaza across from the main entrance to Okemo Mountain. 

 Peter building a new large pallet for the front of our tractor. We use a large platform like this to move around transplants and loaded harvest bins. After a couple years the pallet needs to be rebuilt. Thanks Peter! Photo by Adam Ford

Peter building a new large pallet for the front of our tractor. We use a large platform like this to move around transplants and loaded harvest bins. After a couple years the pallet needs to be rebuilt. Thanks Peter! Photo by Adam Ford

CSA Payment

Don't forget to pay for the first half of the CSA season if you haven't yet. If you don't know your balance, let me know. If you need a different payment schedule, that's always ok, just let me know!

Farm News

Early this week we trellised the early tomatoes in the first tunnel. This year we have changed our trellis system for a few reasons. The main reason is because we are starting them so much earlier, so the plants will get that much taller throughout the season. As is it, we always hit a point in the season where we need a step ladder to harvest tomatoes later in the season, and that really slows things down. With our new system we will be able to gently lower the plants as they grow so we can more easily reach the higher fruits later in the season. We think the time saving from climbing up step ladders and moving them around the tunnels will likely pay for itself in the investment in a new trellis system. Plus it makes us feel like a really cool farm, and you can't put a price tag on that.

 Early tomato before we started trellising them, photo by Adam Ford.

Early tomato before we started trellising them, photo by Adam Ford.

We got a jump on some of the earliest transplantings last week in that brief break in the rain, and then also continued some transplanting in the rain because our team is a bunch of awesome, hard core farmers. With this week's nicer days we have been able to transplant the first 4 beds of onions, and several beds of scallions, cilantro, spinach, baby lettuce, and baby chard. We transplant some things early, that most other folks direct seed, because we rely on these early transplants for the end of the spring share. So send sunny thoughts our way once they are in so things mature fast enough for the end of the share! These early veggies are baby lettuce, spinach, mesclun mix, radishes, salad turnips, baby bok choi, and arugula. We also direct seeded batches of all of those as well last week, but they will be ready after this earlier transplanting. Our team used one of the cooler, danker mornings to get almost half of our shiitake logs inoculated! We plan to use the end of the week to catch up on the weekly seeding in the greenhouse.

 Morgan moving seed potatoes to the second floor of the barn to spread them out to green sprout them before we plant, photo by Adam Ford

Morgan moving seed potatoes to the second floor of the barn to spread them out to green sprout them before we plant, photo by Adam Ford

Last week we were about 2 weeks behind on some of the seedings going in to the greenhouse, but thanks to volunteers and our team, we were able to catch up on those seedings and now are where we should be. THANK YOU! I am hopeful that we won't see too much of a production gap from that back log.

 Alice seeding pea shoots in the prop house, photo by Adam Ford

Alice seeding pea shoots in the prop house, photo by Adam Ford

This week I hope to set up our pasture for the milking goats. As soon as the grass starts to green, I love getting the ladies out on fresh forage. They still some back in every evening to be with their kids, but this time of year, they come in with green tinged faces because they are ferociously eating grass after a winter of hay and carrot and beet seconds. I love seeing the different colors on their faces from the food they are eating. The past few weeks they have had orange and magenta hues from the carrots and beets!

 You may notice the magenta hue on the bottom of Zeah's beard.... that's from a beet snack! photo by Adam Ford

You may notice the magenta hue on the bottom of Zeah's beard.... that's from a beet snack! photo by Adam Ford

Many of our plants are making the trek outside the nice greenhouse to our outdoor staging area to harden off before transplanting. It's always funny to do that when we are still getting snow flurries (I am looking at you, Monday morning!) But that's spring around here, and I am loving today's sunny and 80 degree weather!

 Sam and Morgan laying out a silage tarp on a field we will plant in the eraly summer. We use these tarps to suppress weeds and minimize tillage, photo by Adam Ford.

Sam and Morgan laying out a silage tarp on a field we will plant in the eraly summer. We use these tarps to suppress weeds and minimize tillage, photo by Adam Ford.

Have a great week!

-Kara, Ryan, Sam, Morgan, and Peter

 

Shredded Beet Salad

 image from marthastewart.com

image from marthastewart.com

2-3 medium beets, peeled and grated

1/2 bunch of scallions, finely chopped (green and white parts)

2 TBSP olive oil

1 TBSP lemon juice

1 tsp white wine vinegar

1 tsp maple syrup

pinches of oregano, basil, salt, pepper, red pepper flakes, nutmeg, garlic powder

Mix everything together and let sit for dressing to soak into the beets. Eat this as a side dish, or on a green salad, or in sandwiches. I love the freshness of this so much, that I brought a pint of it farmers' market as my snack, and accidentally at the whole jar throughout the day!