last week's cilantro bunches, photo by Adam Ford

last week's cilantro bunches, photo by Adam Ford

Weekly Availability

This week you can choose from yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, green cabbage, leeks, garlic, red onions, carrots, baby carrots, beets, rutabaga, Gilfeather turnip, spinach, meslcun mix, baby kale, Japanese lettuce. 

Please use this link to fill out your form to pick up a share in Ludlow or at the farm: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSewzn_VdO-qNORGtls6yuqaubDZ7mUtrc-UcSx1SSVvvKnWhQ/viewform?c=0&w=1

  fast spinning greens in the converted washing machine! photo by Adam Ford

fast spinning greens in the converted washing machine! photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

Last week, on one of those gorgeous, warm, sunny days with no wind, our power went out at 7 am. We usually assume people care about power more than us, so we didn't bother calling the power company to report the outage, assuming they got plenty of calls. After two and half hours of no power, and us starting to really need it with the seeding work we were doing in the propagation house, I decided to call and see when we were projected to have power turned back on. Well it turns out we were the only ones without power, so it's a good thing I finally decided to call! When the truck came out, the workers noticed the cause of the power outage was a squirrel who must have gotten into the transformer and got zapped. They said it happens all the time. It was wild to see, because when the squirrel got zapped, it got flung a distance and landed upright on a rock, frozen in place. It looked so alive that when a neighbor walked by it later in the day, she thought it was just frozen in place out of fear of her dog. I was sad... I know there are plenty of squirrels out there, but I can't help but think about that squirrel's sweet squirrel buddies who have no idea why he never came home...

  sorry squirrely

sorry squirrely

All of our onions, leeks, shallots, and first round of scallions are started and growing well in the propagation house, as well as all the first rounds of tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, sweet peppers, and hot peppers. Hot peppers are never really a large part of what we move through CSA or farmers' market, but Ryan and I both LOVE spicy food, and we make many variations of hot sauce in the fall. This year I am trying to up my hot sauce game, so I started a wider array of hot peppers this winter to try different flavors in the fall. If you are a spicy food lover as well, definitely be in touch in the summer if you want to make some of your own hot sauce. One spicy type we love is called a Shishito pepper. I don't use this pepper in hot sauces because it isn't reliably spicy enough for me. The best way to enjoy them is to quickly pan fry them in hot oil, and remove them before the skin chars too dark. Then you just eat them. They range from sweet to hot, so who knows what you will bite in to, but as you enjoy a plate of these wonders, you will enjoy their full flavor spectrum. 

  filling flats to seed onions, photo by Adam Ford

filling flats to seed onions, photo by Adam Ford

The greens continue to grow like wild in the tunnels. Feel free to request as many bags of greens as you want in your share. The newer plantings of greens are coming along slow and steady and will be ready for the spring share as these winter ones peter out.

  meslcun mix with new plantings of spinach to the left, photo by Adam Ford

meslcun mix with new plantings of spinach to the left, photo by Adam Ford

Early next week we will have to pot up all the earliest tomatoes into their larger containers. That means they will move from our bathroom (hooray!) out to the propagation house (brrrrr....) So we have to set up our backup heat systems to get ready to send out the all important tomatoes to the outdoor set up!

  walking in and out of the propagation house door, photo by Adam Ford

walking in and out of the propagation house door, photo by Adam Ford

Hope you have a great week!

-Kara and the ESF team

 

Sauteed Spinach with Slow Cooked Garlic

Our dear friend Hannah who worked here two years ago and her partner, Nic, came for a visit last weekend. Nic is an amazing cook, specializing in Italian food. He made the most delicious spinach dish I have literally ever eaten in my life, and I have been trying to eat it every day since then! It is so simple, but so perfect. It's a great side dish, and this volume served 4 of us as a side. (But then I made this amount for myself as my entire dinner the next night!)

  photo from Good House Keeping

photo from Good House Keeping

2 bags spinach

5-8 cloves of garlic, peeled, kept whole

olive oil

salt

Peel garlic, and toss whole cloves in a nice thick bottomed pan with olive oil. Put on low heat (uncovered), and let garlic cook slowly until it lightly browns on the outside. Then dump two bags of spinach in the pan, and cook slow, uncovered. Toss it every few minutes to cook evenly, but don't ever cover it. Once it is all wilted, add salt to taste and enjoy the best spinach ever.