What's Available This Week

This week you can choose from yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, green cabbage, garlic, red onions, carrots, baby carrots, beets, rutabaga, Gilfeather turnip, spinach, meslcun mix, baby kale, and cilantro. 

 Japanese lettuce growing in the tunnel, photo by Adam Ford.

Japanese lettuce growing in the tunnel, photo by Adam Ford.

CSA Details

This is the last week of the winter share. If you haven't finished paying for it, please try to do so this week or let us know you need a different payment schedule. The Spring CSA Share starts on April 20th, so now is a good time to sign up if you are interested. There are a few weeks between the winter share and the spring share that we are offering a bridge of veggies between. Send me an email if you are interested in accessing the continuous veggies.

 We plowed snow away from the sides of the tunnels so the snow could continue to shed from the sides. With so much snow last week, the snow built up and couldn't fall away! Photo by Adam Ford.

We plowed snow away from the sides of the tunnels so the snow could continue to shed from the sides. With so much snow last week, the snow built up and couldn't fall away! Photo by Adam Ford.

Farm or Ludlow Pickup

Please use this form if you want to pick up your share at the farm or in Ludlow. Thanks!

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSewzn_VdO-qNORGtls6yuqaubDZ7mUtrc-UcSx1SSVvvKnWhQ/viewform?c=0&w=1

Farm News

Br!! It's been so cold! It's so nerve wracking to leave all our baby tomatoes in the propagation house on these nights that are below zero, but we have been doing it for years, and it works. We rely on temperature sensors that are in important places around the farm that send alerts to our phones if things are getting too cold. Even though we probably don't need to, on these cold nights, I get up to check those alerts in case I have slept through any important ones. Our sleep is messed up enough with a 1-year old, so why not wake up to check the temperature of the tomato table?!

 Ryan setting up the plumbing for the hot water bench in the propagation house, photo by Adam Ford.

Ryan setting up the plumbing for the hot water bench in the propagation house, photo by Adam Ford.

The heated bench is full of scallions, onions, leeks, shallots, salad turnips, baby bok choi, peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, celeriac, parsley, and oregano. Probably by the end of next week, as we continue to seed some of the earlier outdoor crops, the heated bench will get full and we will have to kick some of the cold tolerant crops off to make space for more warm items. It's not ideal for things like onions to get booted to the cold tables that freeze solid at night, but they can survive it, so we do it.

 Scallion starts under the plastic on the heated bench, photo by Adam Ford.

Scallion starts under the plastic on the heated bench, photo by Adam Ford.

Next week we will transplant some baby bok choi and salad turnips into the tunnels, and continue to plant thousands of seeds in trays getting ready for spring that promises to come at some point!

Have a great week!

-Kara and the ESF team

Best Roasted Potatoes Ever... for real

 photo and recipe from Serious Eats

photo and recipe from Serious Eats

Even though roasted potatoes are an easy, basic thing to make, I highly recommend trying this recipe. We made an over the top fancy dinner for Ryan's birthday, so I skeptically tried this "best roasted potato recipe ever." And it really is.

3 pounds yellow potatoes (2 items worth), cut into 1-inch chunks

1/2 tsp baking soda

2 TBSP salt

2 tsp rosemary

3-6 cloves of garlic, crushed

5 TBSP olive oil

salt and pepper

Bring 2 quarts of water to boil. Add the baking soda and 2 TBSP of salt. Add the chopped potatoes, and cook until you can just pierce them with a fork, slightly under done. Strain the potatoes, and let air dry in the strainer. Meanwhile, cook the garlic and rosemary in the olive oil over low heat in a thick bottomed pan. When the garlic starts to lightly brown, remove it from the heat. Strain the oil from the herbs, saving both. When the potatoes have air dried (for at least 10 minutes), stir the herb infused oil into the potatoes in a bowl, gently. As you stir them, you should notice that the potatoes look like they create a thin layer of "mashed potatoes" on the outside of each chunk. When the potatoes are well coated, spread them on a baking sheet and bake at 400 until they are crispy and lightly browned. Remove from the over and toss with the saved garlic and rosemary, and add salt and pepper to taste. Enjoy!