What’s Available

This week you can choose from red potatoes, yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, red beets, baby lettuce, spinach, garlic, husk cherries, red and green cabbage, red and green napa cabbage, carrots, green curly kale, baby kale, red and yellow onions, spaghetti squash, acorn squash, salad turnips, cilantro, celeriac, and leeks! 

 those big hoops covered the last of the outdoor kale that was harvested for this week! photo by Adam Ford

those big hoops covered the last of the outdoor kale that was harvested for this week! photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details (Including how to pickup in Ludlow)

The remainder of your fall CSA balance is due. Let me know if you need to know your balance. If you need a different payment schedule, just let me know. That’s alright.

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm, from the indoor winter Rutland Farmers’ Market on Saturdays from 10 am to 2pm, (at 251 West Street), and Tygart Mountain Sports in Ludlow between 2pm and 6pm by filling out this form by 8am on Friday: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe3w7FWNKDd_KAj5-QLleXE_LjBNSn2GzUEW26VfYNdajZwhQ/viewform?c=0&w=1 If you come after 6pm your bag will be right outside the door to the store.

 such beautiful snow! photo by Adam Ford

such beautiful snow! photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

We ended up being without power for several days last week, but it conveniently returned when I needed to send out last week’s newsletter! This week we have been enjoying power, as well as the mild day of Monday to take advantage of clearing more snow from around the tunnels before a hard freeze. The more snow we can clear from the sides of the tunnel, the more hours of sunlight that can reach the greens in the tunnel, providing for more growth. Our tractor does the bulk of the work removing the snow, but then we go along and shovel right up close to the tunnel to let in that sunlight. We also use those days above freezing in the winter to spray out all our harvest and storage bins, because we obviously can’t on days where the water would freeze as it hits the bin!

 this is what the tunnels look like as they shed their snow before Ryan plows the snow away from the sides, photo by Adam Ford

this is what the tunnels look like as they shed their snow before Ryan plows the snow away from the sides, photo by Adam Ford

Right now Ryan is at a 2-day conference on high tunnel production in New Hampshire. It’s a technical conference held every other winter for growers in the northeast to keep improving their skills an knowledge on tunnel growing, and to stay up to date on all the innovations in the field. We spoke last night on the phone, and Ryan was telling me about a grower who uses their tunnels to grow multiyear crops that most growers treat as annuals. For example, one grower (in the northeast) is still harvesting fruit from 4 year old eggplants! (Though this does require a phenomenal amount of heat to keep sensitive crops like that alive.)

 this is what it looks like after the tractor moves most of the snow out of the way, and those sides still need to be hand shoveled to make way for sunlight, photo by Adam Ford

this is what it looks like after the tractor moves most of the snow out of the way, and those sides still need to be hand shoveled to make way for sunlight, photo by Adam Ford

And this week is a education heavy week, because I head out for a day for a workshop on farm efficiency with a group of a dozen or so other female farm owners around the state. It’s part of a workshop series for female farm business owners, and so far all of the workshops have been very helpful for our farm. Besides whatever the topic of the day is, I find it invigorating and applicable to get to chat with other women about some of the common challenges of running a farm business to get some new ideas. For the past two years we have been working on standardizing a lot of the work around our farm using SOPs (standard operating procedures). This week I hope to run some of our ideas by the other women of creating a more technical training manual for new employees to work with as they join our team. Most other women in the group run businesses of similar size with similar numbers of employees so it’s a fantastic group to get feedback from.

 Adam takes unbelievable photos of the animals, and this shot of Callie and Echo playing like the wild dogs they are in the snow is fantastic, photo by Adam Ford

Adam takes unbelievable photos of the animals, and this shot of Callie and Echo playing like the wild dogs they are in the snow is fantastic, photo by Adam Ford

Hope you all have a wonderful week!

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Sam, Morgan, Peter, and Taylor


Chicken Alfredo Spaghetti Squash Casserole

 image from faithfulfrugalliving.com

image from faithfulfrugalliving.com

1 spaghetti squash, cut lengthwise, seeds scooped out

olive oil

5 TBSP butter

2 TBSP flour

3-4 garlic cloves

1 1/2 cup milk

1 1/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese

1 TBSP lemon juice

1 tsp salt

1 tsp black pepper

2-3 cups of chopped chicken breast (roughly bite sized cubes), alternative is to use shrimp!!


Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Rub olive oil on the inside of each spaghetti squash half, and place on baking sheet. Bake for about 20-30 minutes, or until you can pierce it with a fork. When it is done, scoop out the flesh and use fork to break up the “noodles.” Meanwhile, in a pan saute the chicken in olive oil and garlic until the chicken is cooked. Remove from heat. In another skillet heat the butter. Whisk in the flour when the butter is melted. Whisk in the milk and 1 cup of the parmesan cheese until it is melted. Stir in the squash “noodles,” garlic chicken, salt, and pepper. Add Spread olive oil inside a a casserole dish. Fill the dish with the mixture. Sprinkle the top with the remaining 1/4 cup of parmesan cheese. Bake for about 15-20 minutes or until the top is golden brown. Enjoy!