What’s Available

This week you can choose from red potatoes, yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, red beets, golden beets, mesclun mix, baby arugula, pea shoots, spinach, baby kale, garlic, red and green cabbage, napa cabbage, carrots, red and yellow onions, spaghetti squash, acorn squash, celeriac, and leeks! 

pea shoots are finally ready for this week! photo by Adam Ford

pea shoots are finally ready for this week! photo by Adam Ford



CSA Details (Including how to pickup in Ludlow)

The remainder of your fall CSA balance is past due. Let me know if you need to know your balance. If you need a different payment schedule, just let me know.

You can pick up your fall share at the farm on Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm, from the indoor winter Rutland Farmers’ Market on Saturdays from 10 am to 2pm, (at 251 West Street), and Tygart Mountain Sports in Ludlow between 2pm and 8pm by filling out this form by 8am on Friday: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe3w7FWNKDd_KAj5-QLleXE_LjBNSn2GzUEW26VfYNdajZwhQ/viewform?c=0&w=1  If you come after 8pm your bag will be right outside the door to the store.

greens uncovered in the tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

greens uncovered in the tunnel, photo by Adam Ford




Farm News

This is the last week of the fall share. THANK YOU so much for joining our CSA. If you were new, thanks for taking that leap of faith, and if you have been with us for awhile, your continued support is humbling. We love getting the opportunity to grow food for so many folks, and we appreciate your continued trust in that project.

this is what the baby lettuce looks like after it is cut.. you are seeing just the beginning of the regrowth starting. It will take several weeks for this type of green to regrow, so we time each cutting based on making sure we have some greens each week throughout the winter, photo by Adam Ford

this is what the baby lettuce looks like after it is cut.. you are seeing just the beginning of the regrowth starting. It will take several weeks for this type of green to regrow, so we time each cutting based on making sure we have some greens each week throughout the winter, photo by Adam Ford

As we mentioned before, we are taking this winter off from a CSA, but all our veggies, storage and fresh greens, will be available at the Rutland Winter Farmers’ Market every Saturday from 10 am to 2 pm. We apologize for the inconvenience if you love our winter CSA, but by the end of the year our website will be updated with the 2019 CSA info. The spring share starts in April if you can’t wait until summer to start getting veggies again.

If you are interested in purchasing any bulk items for winter (potatoes, carrots, beets, cabbage, leeks, rutabaga, gilfeather, etc), send me an email and I will give you our wholesale list for pricing.

red cabbage, photo by Adam Ford

red cabbage, photo by Adam Ford

I enjoy when I get to chat with some of you at market, or even better when you catch me in the cooler at the barn when I am working. I have realized over the course of the season that one of the most popular things I talk about with many of you is cooking and eating food… Which makes obvious sense, but I started thinking about how I often try to focus on the farming side of my life in the newsletter, versus enjoying that finished product inside our home. Cooking and eating is obviously a big hobby of mine, and some folks have asked where my cooking inspiration comes from. That is a super long list, but it informs how I use vegetables in the kitchen now:

this is a variety of baby tat soi that goes into our mesclun mix, photo by Adam Ford

this is a variety of baby tat soi that goes into our mesclun mix, photo by Adam Ford

I was lucky to grow up in a home where we ate delicious family dinners every night that (usually) my mom (and sometimes my dad) made for us with whole ingredients. This probably started my interest in food. Eating flavorful foods, and watching the work and joy that went into those creations were certainly memorable for me. I also went to a farm summer camp as a kid that emphasized home grown food and the importance of trying new foods. In college I lived with a kitchen wizard who would surprise himself with what he would make each night just by going through our fridge and pantry and use what we needed to use. After college I had the unique opportunity to cook weekly 100+ person community meals in the town where we lived for folks who needed it, by using donations from a local farm, donations from the local co-op, and a few purchased ingredients. Those meals were where I put all my exposure and interest in cooking to the greatest test. I had about 3 hours to make a hot meal, salad, soup, and dessert for 100 people with a $20 budget and whatever was donated that day, without about 3-4 helpers. It should have been a reality show, but it wasn’t. This is probably where I learned to look at a pile of turnips, cabbage, and onions, and say, “Wow, we are going to have the best turnip latkes with a sweet and sour cabbage soup!”

chard chugging along in the tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

chard chugging along in the tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

Now my adventures in the kitchen are also influenced by googling things on the internet, trying to recreate things I eat outside the house, and making the best use of “farmer food,” which is veggies that are not good enough to market, so we eat them. It’s my goal to eat in a thrifty, delicious way that provides the healthiest source of nourishment for my family. This time of year if I am lacking inspiration I roast things and add them to pasta dishes, soups, salads, sandwiches. Almost everything tastes better roasted. Are you a garlic lover? Next time you make soup, no matter what it is, roast a head or two (papers on, just put the whole bulb in the oven while something else is cooking), and when you serve the soup, peel the roasted garlic cloves and drop them whole into the soup… You will love it. (We just did this with a Thai corn chowder this week, but have also done it with a potato leek soup, squash soup, chicken soup, bean soup, etc.) If I don’t feel like roasting, another standby is grating any of the root veggies with onions or leeks, mixing them with an egg and a bit of flour and whatever spices speak to you that day, and pan frying pancakes out of them. Sometimes it’s fun to pick one root veggie, one allium, and one spice to listen to all the flavors clearly… Like Gilfeather, leeks, and nutmeg…. such a good combo.

ear protection on the tractor… Adam did such a cool thing last week with his photos… he found all the vibrant colors around the farm which is such a fun perspective in the white, white winter… even though this is the last newsletter, I will post some updates on our website during the winter, and I will do a feature of all the color that Adam has found on the farm, photo by Adam Ford

ear protection on the tractor… Adam did such a cool thing last week with his photos… he found all the vibrant colors around the farm which is such a fun perspective in the white, white winter… even though this is the last newsletter, I will post some updates on our website during the winter, and I will do a feature of all the color that Adam has found on the farm, photo by Adam Ford

Some of you have asked if I use recipes…. and I don’t use them the way they are intended. I use recipes to give me ideas to use our food with. When I lack inspiration, I will turn to the internet to see what food bloggers are doing with a spaghetti squash or find a new way to use a beet, and then I add my own flair and interpretation on recipes that I read.

So this winter, if you keep getting veggies from us at market, or stock up on bulk items, and want to be creative with vegetables, try improvising with a carrot where a recipe calls for a sweet pepper, or try cabbage in a recipe that normally sautes chard!

Thank you again for all your support. However you celebrate and gather during this holiday season, we hope you experience joy, and rest, and love.

went into the woods to cut our first little Christmas tree as a family of 4, photo by Adam Ford

went into the woods to cut our first little Christmas tree as a family of 4, photo by Adam Ford

See you in the spring!

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Morgan, Peter, Taylor, and Sam


Thai Corn Chowder

Swap out the chicken broth for veggie broth to make this soup vegan! And I don’t keep red curry paste in my pantry.. instead I always google what spices to mix together to make my own Thai red curry paste.

image from tastespace.com

image from tastespace.com

2-3 small to medium onions, finely chopped

2-3 carrots, cubed into small bite sized pieces

3-4 potatoes, cubed into small bit sized pieces

1 small cabbage, red or green, finely chopped

1 leeks, finely chopped

1 head of garlic (optional)

3 cups frozen corn

6 cups chicken broth

1 can coconut milk

1/3 cup lime juice

5 TBSP red curry paste

salt as needed

optional 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes

3 TBSP sunflower oil


Put the whole head of garlic in the oven at 400. Bake until the cloves are soft, remove from heat, and set aside. In a large pot, saute onions, cabbage, carrots, and leeks in the sunflower oil until tender. Add the potatoes, corn, broth, coconut milk, lime juice, red curry paste, and salt. Let the soup slowly simmer until potatoes are soft. Add whole, peeled roasted garlic cloves. Add salt or lime as needed. Enjoy!