What’s Available

This week you can choose from red potatoes, yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, red beets, golden beets, baby arugula, mesclun mix, baby bok choi, spinach, garlic, husk cherries, red and green cabbage, napa cabbage, carrots, green curly kale, red and yellow onions, spaghetti squash, butternut squash, acorn squash, sweet peppers, jalapenos, radishes, salad turnips, cilantro, and leeks! 

 Peter harvesting red cabbage, photo by Adam Ford

Peter harvesting red cabbage, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details (Including how to pickup in Ludlow)

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm, from the indoor winter Rutland Farmers’ Market on Saturdays from 10 am to 2pm, (at 251 West Street), and Tygart Mountain Sports in Ludlow between 2pm and 5pm by filling out this form by 8am on Friday: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe3w7FWNKDd_KAj5-QLleXE_LjBNSn2GzUEW26VfYNdajZwhQ/viewform?c=0&w=1 If you come after 5pm your bag will be right outside the door to the store.

Half of your remaining balance is due. If you need a different payment plan and haven’t set one up yet, let me know. (That’s not a problem.)

 baby lettuce growing in the high tunnel for winter harvest, photo by Adam Ford

baby lettuce growing in the high tunnel for winter harvest, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

So much rain! It has been so wet lately that it is tough for us to get in the field with the tractor to use our undercutter bar to harvest storage carrots. This time of year we really rely on using the tractor for storage carrots because it is significantly faster than forking them loose from the soil. In wet times like these it is awesome we have permanent sod paths between the beds because those paths hold our weight and the weight of our tractor waaaaaaay better than the soaking wet beds. Today as I was crossing some beds of cabbage, I accidentally stepped in the bed versus the sod path, and I sunk in so far, I almost lost my boot to the mud. One of the reasons I chose to establish a farm in the northeast is that the northeast of the United States is projected to be one of the places to have potable water the longest in the face of climate catastrophe in the future, but in the meantime, these wet spells can be tough.

 leek, photo by Adam Ford

leek, photo by Adam Ford

We are still harvesting the weekly greens from outside under row covers so that the indoor greens can continue to grow and put size on. It’s amazing how much protection greens can get from just a thin layer of row cover.

 fall greens covered for cold protection, photo by Adam Ford

fall greens covered for cold protection, photo by Adam Ford

Soon we will add that same type of row cover over our fall planted onion experiment in hopes of having early summer onions.

We are mulching a thin layer of straw on beds that we are clearing out late in the season, where it is too late to plant a cover crop for the winter. We work hard to minimize the amount of exposed soil over winter.

 this picture makes me feel like summer just refuses to be over, and I am ok with that, photo by Adam Ford

this picture makes me feel like summer just refuses to be over, and I am ok with that, photo by Adam Ford

At the end of last week, we took advantage of some of the lousier weather to do a first pass on weeding in the high tunnels. Weed pressure is so different during each season. For instance, in the fall, we have very few weeds that are competing with our fall harvested outdoor greens… The most annoying weed is actually dried, dead foliage from the oak, maple, and ash trees that line our fields! Funny that those are “weeds,” but they blow into the fields when they fall off and we have to do our best to pick them out when we harvest and wash salad greens. In the winter our biggest weed pressure is chickweed and grasses in the high tunnel. If we spend a little amount of time now hoeing the tiny weeds, we won’t be fighting larger mats of them later in the winter when they would otherwise swallow up winter greens. Culinarily, we could learn to enjoy chickweed, though I haven’t put in that effort yet. But since we aren’t ruminants (like our goats), we won’t be able to learn to digest grass, so they just have to get out of the tunnel plantings before they take over.

 fun shot of the winter greens growing in the tunnel through a rip in the high tunnel plastic…. Adam is a pro at artfully finding repair jobs we need to catch up on, photo by Adam Ford

fun shot of the winter greens growing in the tunnel through a rip in the high tunnel plastic…. Adam is a pro at artfully finding repair jobs we need to catch up on, photo by Adam Ford

Hopefully by next week, we will have had enough drying weather to dig the rest of the storage carrots out of the ground. Then we will move onto the bulk harvests of leeks and cabbage.

 Sky hasn’t tried a veggie he doesn’t like yet, how about you? (He even likes sauerkraut! And calls brussels sprouts bacon!!)

Sky hasn’t tried a veggie he doesn’t like yet, how about you? (He even likes sauerkraut! And calls brussels sprouts bacon!!)

Have a great week!

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Morgan, Sam, Peter, Taylor


Kara’s Knock-Off Drunken Noodles

 image from kitchenconfidante.com

image from kitchenconfidante.com

(This is a meal I make when I am craving peanut noodles, but want to share a meal with friends with a peanut allergy. It’s inspired by a few different recipes, all jammed together. Give it a shot if you like fresh flavors. For extra veggie fun, use spaghetti squash as your noodle. Below is the basic base, but feel free to add extra shredded or chopped veggies to the mix. Anything is good in this. Also feel free to add chicken, tofu, shrimp, etc.)

1 pound of pasta (I enjoy it best with a wide egg noodle)

1 head of garlic, crushed

1 bunch of cilantro, finely chopped

2 medium onions, sliced thin

1 head of Napa cabbage, finely chopped

3-4 carrots, grated

2 inches ginger root

3 TBSP dried basil

3 TBSP sunflower oil

1/3 cup lime juice

3 TBSP maple syrup

1/3 cup soy sauce

1 jalapeno, finely chopped (optional)

In a pan, bring the sunflower oil to a high heat, and toss in the onions and Napa. Once they are cooked, add the dried basil, soy sauce, lime juice, and maple syrup. Stir well and turn off the heat. Meanwhile, cooked your pasta and strain it. In a large bowl, put your strained pasta and pour over the flavored onion and Napa cabbage mixture. Add the grated carrots, crushed garlic, grated ginger, chopped cilantro, and chopped jalapeno. Stir well and let sit for at least 10 minutes so the juices absorb into the pasta. If it feels like it needs more sauce, add a more soy sauce, lime juice, and maple syrup a little at a time to nail the taste you enjoy. This is great warm, room temperature, or cold, so feel free to scale up the recipe and have great leftovers!