What’s Available

This week you can choose from red potatoes, yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, red beets, golden beets, baby lettuce, garlic, husk cherries, red and green cabbage, red and green napa cabbage, carrots, green curly kale, red and yellow onions, spaghetti squash, acorn squash, salad turnips, cilantro, celeriac, and leeks! 

Culinary hack: Love romaine, but afraid from the recent food born illness outbreak? Use Napa leaves on your sandwiches the way you would romaine.

 deer tracks in the snow, snacking on our cover crop, photo by Adam Ford

deer tracks in the snow, snacking on our cover crop, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details (Including how to pickup in Ludlow)

The remainder of your fall CSA balance is due this week. Let me know if you need to know your balance. If you need a different payment schedule, just let me know. That’s alright.

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm, from the indoor winter Rutland Farmers’ Market on Saturdays from 10 am to 2pm, (at 251 West Street), and Tygart Mountain Sports in Ludlow between 2pm and 6pm by filling out this form by 8am on Friday: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe3w7FWNKDd_KAj5-QLleXE_LjBNSn2GzUEW26VfYNdajZwhQ/viewform?c=0&w=1 If you come after 6pm your bag will be right outside the door to the store.

If your power doesn’t come back on in time to access this newsletter and order your bag for Ludlow delivery, just send me an email when you have power back and we will figure something out.

 my mom built a snowman with all the grandkids during Thanksgiving week, photo by Adam Ford

my mom built a snowman with all the grandkids during Thanksgiving week, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

Our power came back on today! It’s not that big of a deal for us to be without power in our home, but usually a full day without power is a little challenging for the farm. A fair bit of our production relies on electricity: Our cooler needs to be on to keep veggies properly stored. Our well pump needs to work so we can wash veggies in the wash station. We need power for the auger and fan to work in the pellet stove that heats the soil in one of the high tunnels. We need internet to send out weekly CSA newsletters and to communicate with chefs and buyers regarding wholesale orders. This list goes on. So usually after 10 or 12 hours or so we need to start enacting backup solutions for certain concerns.

 when your sledding hill is short, you gotta add a jump, photo by Adam Ford

when your sledding hill is short, you gotta add a jump, photo by Adam Ford

This power outage was especially humorous because Tesla was scheduled to come install a power wall on Tuesday which will allow us to access power from our solar panels during an outage. They traveled all the way from Burlington to about 200 feet below our driveway, when their vehicle couldn’t make it further up the snowy hill. If only we would have known we could have pulled them up the rest of the way, since Ryan was already out plowing with the tractor. It would have been wild to put the power wall right into action when we needed it this week. At any rate, it will be installed at some point, and help us provide for another layer of backup for the farm systems that are currently more vulnerable to an extended power outage.

We took full advantage of our first snow day and celebrated Sky’s second birthday by keeping him home from day care and sledding most of the day.

 this little man turned 2 this week, and love’s wearing mama’s glasses!

this little man turned 2 this week, and love’s wearing mama’s glasses!

This week we harvested our first greens from the tunnel. It’s only a minor bummer, but with all the additional snow, we have accepted defeat that we won’t get to harvest the last of the greens under row cover outside. This time of year reminds me how much of a gambler a farmer must be. We have to take our best guess on what the average air temperatures will be in September, October, November, and then seed accordingly so greens don’t get too big in the tunnels before we finish harvesting outside, and so they are big enough for when we have to start harvesting inside. This week we will have baby lettuce, baby kale, and Napa cabbage available, but as the weeks go on we will have a greater variety again.

Hope everyone who lost power gets it back soon and is able to stay warm. Have a great week!

 grainy family birthday selfie in the snow

grainy family birthday selfie in the snow

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Sam, Peter, Morgan, and Taylor


Fresh Spring Rolls

 image from asweetpeachef.com

image from asweetpeachef.com

If you have never made sprign rolls, they are actually quite easy. I assure people that they are about as time consuming as making a sandwhich, it’s just that the wrapper is different. The ket to rolling a spring roll is getting the rice wrapper plenty wet. If you are new to it, check out this website for excellent instructions: https://www.asweetpeachef.com/healthy-spring-roll-recipes/ You can use just about anything in a spring role, and you can make any dipping sauce. Below is our go to farm spring rolls:

2-3 carrots, thinly sliced

1 small napa cabbage, thinly sliced into ribbons

1 beet, thinly sliced, or use a vegetable peeler for ribbons

2-3 inches of leek, thinly sliced

1 bunch of cilantro

rice paper wrappers

1/2 cup tamari or soy sauce

1/4 cup maple syrup

1/2 cup lime juice

1/4 cup toasted sesame oil

2-3 garlic cloves, crushed

2 tsp red pepper flakes (optional)

Mix all the veggies in a bowl. Fill a large bowl with lukewarm water that will be big enough to place a rice paper wrapper in. Submerge a rice paper wrapper in the bowl, and when it is totally pliable, remove from the water and put on a flat surface. Add about 1/2 cup of the mixed veggies in the center of the wrapper in a rectangle. Fold the two short ends in and then roll the rest of it up, tucking in the ends. Repeat this until you are out of veggies or wrappers. (Feel free to use any extra prepared veggies in a stir fry. Whisk together the remaining ingredients for the dipping sauce. Enjoy!