What’s Available

This week you can choose from red potatoes, yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, red beets, golden beets, baby arugula, mesclun mix, baby bok choi, spinach, garlic, husk cherries, red and green cabbage, red and green napa cabbage, carrots, green curly kale, red and yellow onions, spaghetti squash, butternut squash, acorn squash, radishes, salad turnips, cilantro, and leeks! 

 I love this picture so much… I don’t know exactly what’s going on here, but both Morgan and Sam’s faces sum up pretty clearly what it’s like to start battling frozen components of an outdoor wash station, photo by Adam Ford

I love this picture so much… I don’t know exactly what’s going on here, but both Morgan and Sam’s faces sum up pretty clearly what it’s like to start battling frozen components of an outdoor wash station, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details (Including how to pickup in Ludlow)

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm, from the indoor winter Rutland Farmers’ Market on Saturdays from 10 am to 2pm, (at 251 West Street), and Tygart Mountain Sports in Ludlow between 2pm and 5pm by filling out this form by 8am on Friday: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe3w7FWNKDd_KAj5-QLleXE_LjBNSn2GzUEW26VfYNdajZwhQ/viewform?c=0&w=1 If you come after 5pm your bag will be right outside the door to the store.

Farm News

It’s cold! I just spent an hour packing wholesale orders out in the barn, and my toes are telling me it’s winter! Every year we fantasize about a 4-season wash and pack station, and I know some year we will make it happen… Until then, the transition season is always the hardest to wash and pack. Hopefully soon we will make time to move the wash station into one of the high tunnels for the winter, to keep it enclosed, sunnier, and out of the wind. But for now, I will just keep stamping my feet as I pack bins of squash and cabbage to take to the co-op.

 high tunnel housing the winter greens, photo by Adam Ford

high tunnel housing the winter greens, photo by Adam Ford

Everything is harvested from outside! (Well kind of… we keep harvesting kale bunches from outside even when they are frozen solid. When they come in from the cold they de-frost tender and super sweet. This is a great time of year for kale.) This is awesome since it is getting down into the single digits this weekend. Red and green Napa cabbage were the last items we snagged from the field on Saturday. They store well in our root cellar, and will be a fresh crunchy treat for awhile. We have been eating about a head a day, chopping them into sandwhiches and wraps, or on tacos or egg sandwiches in the morning. I will do a feature on Napa next week to highlight this unsung hero of a hardy winter storage green.

 row covered kale… even though they freeze solid under there the row cover keeps the quality higher before we pick them, photo by Adam Ford

row covered kale… even though they freeze solid under there the row cover keeps the quality higher before we pick them, photo by Adam Ford

Leeks were bulk harvested and stored in the root cellar as well as the red and green cabbages. We store the leeks dirty with their roots on so they last longer. Then each week we chop off roots and clean up several bins for the week. After this week our weekly harvest and prep work for CSA and markets occurs in the tunnels and in the root cellar… harvesting new greens, and cleaning up storage veggies. Since it’s less weekly work than the summer season, we turn our attention to repair projects that are long overdue. First up today, in fact, will be patching some holes in the high tunnel and fixing an air vent in one of the tunnels.

 cabbage left behind because of lesser quality… no worries, I call that goat food, photo by Adam Ford

cabbage left behind because of lesser quality… no worries, I call that goat food, photo by Adam Ford

Another interesting thing that will be happening this winter is that Ryan is partnering with researchers at UVM to install temperature sensors in our tunnels. As we look at potentially putting up a third tunnel, managing one with ground heat, and generally trying to dial in our precision at producing winter greens, this is just another tool in our tool kit to improve our skills and yields with winter greens. Growing winter greens is both a science and an art, and temperature is just one of many factors that affect growth and quality in our winter greens. For the research we will have our row covers at different heights over different beds. UVM will be doing that main data collection, but we will also be doing our own tracking with them as well. Not sure exactly where this information will take us, but as a previous science major in college, it’s always fun to start collecting data to see what it can tell us.

 this is one of those holes in the tunnel we need to repair…. but through the hole you can see row covered greens.. the hoops provide a different height to compare temperatures above the greens, photo by Adam Ford

this is one of those holes in the tunnel we need to repair…. but through the hole you can see row covered greens.. the hoops provide a different height to compare temperatures above the greens, photo by Adam Ford

Hope everyone stays warm, and enjoys the white that has covered the ground!

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Taylor, Sam, Morgan, and Peter



Bright Red Cabbage Salad

  image from tastingpage.com

image from tastingpage.com

1 head red cabbage, finely chopped into thin ribbons

2 firm avocados, cubed

2 carrots, shredded

1 red onion, finely chopped into thin slices

3-4 garlic cloves, crushed

3 TBSP olive oil

3 TBSP lime juice

1 tsp salt

1 bunch cilantro, finely chopped

1 TBSP maple syrup

Cover sliced red onion and crushed garlic in the olive oil, lime juice, maple syrup, and salt a couple hours (or a day) before making this recipe. About an hour before you want to serve this salad, pour the bowl of onion goodness over the thinly sliced red cabbage and mix well. Let sit. Before serving add the shredded carrot and cubed avocado and enjoy! Leftovers of this salad can be enjoyed in a sandwich or wrap or on a taco.