What’s Available

This week you can choose from red potatoes, yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, red beets, golden beets, baby arugula, mesclun mix, baby lettuce, shiitake mushrooms, garlic, green tomatoes, husk cherries, red and green cabbage, napa cabbage, carrots, broccoli, green curly kale, red and yellow onions, spaghetti squash, butternut squash, acorn squash, delicata squash, and leeks! 

 Sam washing lettuce, photo by Adam Ford

Sam washing lettuce, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details (Including how to pickup in Ludlow)

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm, from the Rutland Farmers’ Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2pm, and Tygart Mountain Sports in Ludlow between 2pm and 5pm by filling out this form by 8am on Friday: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe3w7FWNKDd_KAj5-QLleXE_LjBNSn2GzUEW26VfYNdajZwhQ/viewform?c=0&w=1 If you come after 5pm your bag will be right outside the door to the store.

CSA Reminders

Now is a great time to sign up for the fall share! https://www.eveningsongcsa.com/csa-fall-share . Also, if you aren’t on a payment plan, and you haven’t finished paying for your summer share, now is a great time to do so. Let me know if you need to know your balance. It’s easiest for us if you can finish paying before the fall share starts.

 Sky wonders if his lawn mower will also work on the gravel, photo by Adam Ford

Sky wonders if his lawn mower will also work on the gravel, photo by Adam Ford

Bulk Availability

Send me an email if you want any of the items below in bulk for preserving. These are wholesale prices we make available to CSA members and their friends a family.

  • garlic for $10 per pound

  • red or golden beets for $2 per pound

  • frozen elderberries are $60 for 10 pound bag

  • husk cherries for $6 per pound

  • red or green cabbage for $1.50 per pound

  • napa cabbage for $1 per pound

  • red or yellow potatoes for $1.75 per pound

  • fingerlings for $2.25 per pound

  • butternut or acorn squash for $1.20 per pound

  • delicata or spaghetti squash for $1.80 per pound

 Though beautiful, the fall foliage is a “weed” this time of year when it falls on crops we are still harvesting, like this red napa cabbage, photo by Adam Ford

Though beautiful, the fall foliage is a “weed” this time of year when it falls on crops we are still harvesting, like this red napa cabbage, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

We finished harvesting all the storage beets for the season, hooray! This year we really scaled back the volume of storage vegetables we planted for selling throughout the winter, because the fall season has been notoriously hard and stressful to get everything done. It’s usually about this time of year where we both decide that farming is horrible and we need to quit because the demands of fall are so high and relentless. This fall feels much more different since we scaled our work load appropriately to what our farm can handle, and we love it! We have started the potato harvest, and we are going to save most bulk harvested vegetables for later to allow them to keep sizing up or staying fresh in the field for weekly harvests.

 These are crates of disinfected tomato clips ready to store for next season. We use these clips to trellis tomatoes during the season, and when the plants are removed we save the clips, sterilize them to prevent disease inoculation next season, and store them to re-use each year, photo by Adam Ford

These are crates of disinfected tomato clips ready to store for next season. We use these clips to trellis tomatoes during the season, and when the plants are removed we save the clips, sterilize them to prevent disease inoculation next season, and store them to re-use each year, photo by Adam Ford

There is only one tiny section of the winter high tunnels to plant out to bok choi, but the rest is all snugged in and ready for winter. We hold off on planting garlic until later in the fall since we have been having warmer and warmer falls. It’s not good for the garlic to grow well enough to put up shoots before winter, and that started happening to us before we moved garlic planting back. Now we aim for the end of October: ideally the garlic has enough growing time to establish great roots before winter, but doesn’t poke through the soil.

 transplanted and seeded tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

transplanted and seeded tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

We are also experimenting with overwintering onions this year to aim for a much earlier onion harvest in the early summer. Paul and Sandy Arnold over at Pleasant Valley farm in Argyle New York rave about overwintered onions so we are giving it a go. Cross your fingers!

 Looks like it is time to re-bait the electric deer fence, photo by Adam Ford

Looks like it is time to re-bait the electric deer fence, photo by Adam Ford

This week our farmer profile is on Mikayla! Mikayla has been working with us since May this season, and she came to us with plenty of previous farm experience. Last season she worked on a great farm in the Middlebury area called Golden Russet Farm. At that farm, the exclusively produce high quality food for wholesale markets, so the work rhythm tends to be different on a farm like that compared to a farm like ours where we juggle CSA, farmers’ markets, restaurants, co-ops, caterers, etc.

 Mikayla sorting tomatoes, photo by Adam Ford

Mikayla sorting tomatoes, photo by Adam Ford

Mikayla graduated from Green Mountain College after completing a super cool intensive project interviewing many farms around Vermont to learn how different farms function. If you a farm nerd like myself, you can check out her very well executed project here: https://sustainablefarmingsystemsis.wordpress.com/

 Mikayla washing greens in the summer, photo by Adam Ford

Mikayla washing greens in the summer, photo by Adam Ford

Besides farming, Mikayla has many active hobbies such as ultimate frisbee and hiking. She previously hiked the Appalachian Trail, and this summer she took a couple weeks off from farming to walk the Camino de Santiago with her mom and sister.

Mikayla brings lots of skills to the team, especialyl since she has had farm experience before. She is a quick, hard worker, with a super enjoyable attitude to work with. We will be sad when Mikayla moves on, but she has so much else to explore and experience before putting her roots down in a one place. We are excited to see what life brings her next!

 We are so unbelievably lucky to live and work here, photo by Adam Ford

We are so unbelievably lucky to live and work here, photo by Adam Ford

Next week we may start prepping the eventual garlic planting by cracking all the heads we will plant. And we will also likely transplant out all our little winter onions!

Have a great week.

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Mikayla, Morgan, Sam, Taylor, and Peter


Kimchi!!

 image from thelocalkitchner.com

image from thelocalkitchner.com

If you love fermented food like we do, do yourself a favor and make some kimchi. Although there are many awesome uses for napa cabbage, we will explore those later. For now, bang out a batch of kimchi, let it ferment, and enjoy in a couple week! (This is not an authentic Korean recipe, but what I do at home. Mine doesn’t look as red as the picture above because I use our green jalapenos instead of red chili flakes.)

1 head napa cabbage, thinly sliced

2 red onions, thinly sliced

1 head garlic, crushed

2 inches of ginger root, grated

3-4 carrots, thinly sliced

1 jalapeno, thinly sliced

3 TBSP salt

Put the napa, onions, carrots, and jalapenos through a food processor with the slicer blade. (If you don’t have a food processor, you can just chop each of those items finely, it will just take a bit longer.) In a large bowl, mix together the shredded veggies with the crushed garlic, grated ginger, and salt. When it is finely mixed pack the mixture tightly into as many jars as you need, pushing down so the liquid covers the veggies. (I use the biggest jars possible to minimize the number of jars I need to ferment.) Then cover with a loose dish cloth, and let sit for 1-2 weeks. When it is fermented to your preferred level of sourness, put it in the fridge. (If a layer of mold grows on the top of your kimchi during fermentation, just carefully scrape that off. That happens when there isn’t enough liquid covering the veggies. It is natural and not dangerous. Just chuck that top layer because it tastes gross. Everything underneath it is fine.)