This is the last week of the summer CSA

Thank you so much for joining us for the summer season. We are always grateful for the people and families who choose to trust us with their local food production, no matter what season it is. It’s a privilege to get to share our work with others, and most of you have been with us for sooooo long. A big thank you from all of the team at the farm for your continued support. I hope to get off a survey looking for feedback in the next several weeks, so stay tuned for that if you are willing to share your thoughts with us so we can continue to improve our products every year. If you want to continue getting a fall share, which begins next week, and can also be picked up in Ludlow, Rutland, or at the farm, sign up for a fall share here: https://www.eveningsongcsa.com/csa-fall-share

 snow on the broccoli! I guess it’s the end of the summer CSA for sure! photo by Adam Ford

snow on the broccoli! I guess it’s the end of the summer CSA for sure! photo by Adam Ford

What’s Available

This week you can choose from red potatoes, yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, red beets, golden beets, baby arugula, baby lettuce, baby bok choi, microgreens, garlic, husk cherries, red and green cabbage, napa cabbage, carrots, broccoli, green curly kale, red and yellow onions, spaghetti squash, butternut squash, acorn squash, sweet peppers, jalapenos, brussels sprouts, and leeks! 

 Peter harvesting some snowy lettuce, photo by Adam Ford

Peter harvesting some snowy lettuce, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details (Including how to pickup in Ludlow)

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm, from the Rutland Farmers’ Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2pm, and Tygart Mountain Sports in Ludlow between 2pm and 5pm by filling out this form by 8am on Friday: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe3w7FWNKDd_KAj5-QLleXE_LjBNSn2GzUEW26VfYNdajZwhQ/viewform?c=0&w=1 If you come after 5pm your bag will be right outside the door to the store.

 I can’t get enough of these snow on veggie pictures… snow on cabbage, photo by Adam Ford

I can’t get enough of these snow on veggie pictures… snow on cabbage, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Reminders

If you haven’t finished paying for your summer share, now is a great time to do so. Let me know if you need to know your balance. 

 Ryan harvesting brussels sprouts… back when we grew significantly more brussels sprouts we used a chain saw to cut down the stalks much faster than a hand saw can do, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan harvesting brussels sprouts… back when we grew significantly more brussels sprouts we used a chain saw to cut down the stalks much faster than a hand saw can do, photo by Adam Ford

Bulk Availability

Send me an email if you want any of the items below in bulk for preserving. These are wholesale prices we make available to CSA members and their friends a family.

  • garlic for $10 per pound

  • red or golden beets for $2 per pound

  • frozen elderberries are $60 for 10 pound bag

  • husk cherries for $6 per pound

  • red or green cabbage for $1.50 per pound

  • napa cabbage for $1 per pound

  • red or yellow potatoes for $1.75 per pound

  • fingerlings for $2.25 per pound

  • butternut or acorn squash for $1.20 per pound

  • spaghetti squash for $1.80 per pound

  • carrots for $1.80 per pound

 snow in the kale, photo by Adam Ford

snow in the kale, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

The garlic is planted! Often people calculate their garlic planting based on the number of cloves they plant, which corresponds to the greatest number of bulbs they will harvest the following year. We always calculate that as how many bed feet we plant, versus the number of individual plants, and then compare that to the weight of the harvest, since our cost of production numbers are based on weighted garlic sales. But this year I was curious, so I figured out we planted 5280 cloves, which actually sounds a bit small to me!

 Sam hoeing baby greens in the winter tunnels, photo by Adam Ford

Sam hoeing baby greens in the winter tunnels, photo by Adam Ford

As I write this, the team is working on transplanting our over-wintered onion experiment. We started onion seeds way back in the summer shortly after our baby was born. Now the plants are ready to be put in the field. We will put several layers of heavy duty row cover over them, and hopefully see them thrive in the spring to produce really early onions. This is pretty exciting. If it works well, and if we ever chose to expand our onion production for a larger volume of winter storage, it means we could have locally grown onions available year round. It’s fun to keep our creative brains going as farmers to try new ways to expand the local food shed.

 baby onions waiting to be transplanted for the winter, photo by Adam Ford

baby onions waiting to be transplanted for the winter, photo by Adam Ford

For us, it never feels like the farm or the CSA stops since we have several CSA seasons and grow and store veggies year round. But even though we feel the continuation, our summer CSA always has our largest membership, so for some people this IS the last week you get local food with us before next season, so it has had me reflecting on some of the highlights from this season as the summer CSA wraps up:

Obviously our biggest highlight was the birth of our second kiddo, Soraya Grace. She has been such a sweet addition to our life, and our favorite part is watching how much Sky has loved getting to know her and being a loving older brother. I suppose another kid highlight is watching Sky be able to call each green we grow by their proper name… You know that your 22-month old is a farm kid when he knows the difference between mesclun, lettuce, bok choi, and pea shoots.

 Sky often asks to hold his sister.

Sky often asks to hold his sister.

As for the farm, it was very exciting to us to get the pellet stove hooked up to heat the ground in one of our tunnels. We were harvesting tomatoes and cucumbers about a month earlier than we would usually be able to. We are excited to follow the learning curve of this new technology to see how our growing improves over the seasons with this new tool.

We also loved working with our crew this year. We always work with great people, and this year was no exception. Having a second kid forced us to hand off much more of the daily farm operation to our team without our direct oversight, and we are grateful they have been doing so well at it. It can be hard to have invisible managers, and they are fantastic at managing that nuance.

We also enjoyed our first huge elderberry harvest. We sold some to Long Trail brewing for a special seasonal sour ale, and I am excited to explore the world of elderberry syrup production for the future. We have a huge grove of elderberry bushes, and originally installed them for land management, and now we are discovering that they can be something whose berries we share off the farm, too.

We grew some of the best leeks we have ever grown, which is exciting. We like getting good at certain crops that have bummed us out in the past. Leeks are especially exciting because Ryan has been monitoring for the new pest Leek Moth for a couple years now which is ravaging allium production in the north east. We are still lucky not to have it yet, but that luck may not last forever.

Most of the garlic sized up the way we hoped it would. We trialed several different varieties of crops we are excited about. Basil lasted longer than it ever has for us since the arrival of basil downy mildew from Europe about 8 years ago. Usually those plants are dead by early September, but this year we were pulling out fantastic plants when we transitioned the tunnels to winter greens. Lots of veggie successes to celebrate.

 on the left are trays of pea shoots seeded for winter harvest… this time of year we seed many, many trays of pea shoots that will grow high enough and then be stockpiled in the prop house waiting for harvest each week, row covered enough to keep alive into early winter, photo by Adam Ford

on the left are trays of pea shoots seeded for winter harvest… this time of year we seed many, many trays of pea shoots that will grow high enough and then be stockpiled in the prop house waiting for harvest each week, row covered enough to keep alive into early winter, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan figured out how to minimize production space to maximize more cover crop growth for the health of the soil, which meant we grew the most cover crops we ever have. Although this isn’t something that CSA members see direct affects of, it means we are ensuring healthy soil for generations to come. Maybe your grandkids can eat food from this CSA in the future if we keep taking care of this soil.

 Soraya is a little champ.

Soraya is a little champ.

Thank you all again for sharing the harvest with us. Your continued support not only supports this farm, but jobs for several great humans, and surplus veggies for many charitable food outlets. If you just do the summer share, we will see you next season!

 Look at that fall Sky, photo by Adam Ford

Look at that fall Sky, photo by Adam Ford

ESF Team

-Kara, Ryan, Morgan, Peter, Sam, Mikayla, and Taylor


Stir Fried Napa Cabbage with Acorn Squash

 image from foodandwine.com

image from foodandwine.com

1 head napa cabbage, thinly sliced

4 cloves garlic, crushed

1-2 inches of leek, thinly sliced

1 acorn squash

3 TBSP sesame oil

2 TBSP sesame seeds

3 TBSP soy sauce

1 TBSP maple syrup

1 TBSP lemon juice

1 1/2 cups rice

3 cups water

Put rice and water in a pot on a low simmer to cook. Meanwhile, peel an acorn squash. Slice in half and remove the seeds. Cut the peeled, seeded squash into 1/4-inch thick rounds. Heat the sesame oil in a pan and toss in the thin acorn squash slices. Let cook until lightly browned on one side, and then flip. Let the other side brown as well. Remove from the pan and set aside. Put thinly sliced napa, crushed garlic, soy sauce, maple syrup, and lemon juice in the pan and saute until the napa is soft. Serve the squash and napa over rice. Enjoy!