What’s Available

This week you can choose from red potatoes, yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, red beets, golden beets, baby arugula, mesclun mix, baby lettuce, shiitake mushrooms, garlic, green tomatoes, husk cherries, red and green cabbage, red and yellow onions, spaghetti squash, butternut squash, acorn squash, delicata squash, and leeks! 

 acorn squash, photo by Adam Ford

acorn squash, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Reminders

Now is a great time to sign up for the fall share! https://www.eveningsongcsa.com/csa-fall-share . Also, if you aren’t on a payment plan, and you haven’t finished paying for your summer share, now is a great time to do so. Let me know if you need to know your balance. It’s easiest for us if you can finish paying before the fall share starts.

 husk cherry who fell into the celeriac leaves, photo by Adam Ford

husk cherry who fell into the celeriac leaves, photo by Adam Ford

Bulk Availability

Send me an email if you want any of the items below in bulk for preserving. These are wholesale prices we make available to CSA members and their friends a family.

  • zucchini for $1.50 per pound  

  • garlic for $10 per pound

  • beets for $2 per pound

  • frozen elderberries are $60 for 10 pound bag

  • husk cherries for $6 per pound

  • cabbage for $1.50 per pound

  • shiitake mushrooms for $12 per pound

 summer is clinging on, photo by Adam Ford

summer is clinging on, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm. If you are new to coming to the farm, use "680 Shunpike Road, Shrewsbury VT 05738" to get to our driveway.  You can pick up your share from the Ludlow Farmers' Market on Fridays from 4 pm to 6:30 pm on the front lawn of the Okemo Mountain School right on Route 103, just south of down town. This week the market closes earlier at 6:30 pm due to the dark. (The permit at the market does not allow us to let veggies leave the market before 4pm, so please try not to come early.) You can pick up your share from the Rutland Farmers' Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm, right downtown by the Walmart parking lot.

 draining the wash tubs after washing veggies, photo by Adam Ford

draining the wash tubs after washing veggies, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

All the last of the tomatoes from the high tunnels have been removed for winter plantings, and all the the last of the winter squash are harvested for storage. We are hoping to get some drier weather to start harvesting our storage potatoes. With how wet it has been, it would be too difficult to dig them right now.

 many of these empty rows are now transplanted to spinach and seeded to winter greens, photo by Adam Ford

many of these empty rows are now transplanted to spinach and seeded to winter greens, photo by Adam Ford

It seems like our simple, but effective deer fence has become less effective. This time of year it needs to be baited weekly and after every rain, and the wet weather has made it difficult to keep it as a strong deterrent. We are hoping to get it more effective before they start going after our fall lettuces. We call deer our non-paying customers, and there certainly isn’t insurance coverage for deer damage.

 husk cherries drying out and waiting to be winnowed, photo by Adam Ford

husk cherries drying out and waiting to be winnowed, photo by Adam Ford

This week’s farmer profile is on Peter! Peter has been working with us part time for about a year now. It’s always a treat to have someone stay with the team for this long or more, and it’s often fun for people to see this much of a season, as everything cycles through. He started by helping us with the big, bulk winter carrot harvest last fall, and that is right around the corner.

 Peter cleaning leeks, photo by Adam Ford

Peter cleaning leeks, photo by Adam Ford

Before joining our team at the farm, Peter had worked many years as an instructor and director at Camp Woodward, an action sports camp in Pennsylvania. His skills as a kind, easy going, good communicator must have flourished in his leadership roles at the camp. He is a highly skilled skater and snowboarder. He also worked the snow seasons at Killington in the parks crew. During his last season at Killington he was becoming more and more interested in the farm world as he lived with his partner, Morgan, and helped with the farm work at that farm.

 popping lettuce out of trays for transplanting, photo by Adam Ford

popping lettuce out of trays for transplanting, photo by Adam Ford

The work at their home farm is diverse, and Peter has skills in wood-fired maple syrup production, fire wood harvesting, sheep management, blueberry cultivation and harvesting, poultry care, gardening, and so much more. Here at this farm, Peter has been a semi-regular presence at our farmers’ market stands, bringing a natural ability to customer care and talking about the vegetables. When he’s not sharing vegetables with folks at the farmers’ market, we try to have Peter tackle some of the miscellaneous projects around the farm that need attention when the main work or harvesting and washing veggies is under control. A few of the many things Peter has tackled here is building a new large harvest pallet for the tractor, building new pea shoot compost containers, a lot of the weedwhacking around our tunnels, and many other detailed projects. It’s always a great help to have someone break away and do some of the more invisible work of running the farm.

 thanks to Adam’s sleuthing, now we know we gotta fix this irrigation line!

thanks to Adam’s sleuthing, now we know we gotta fix this irrigation line!

We are super grateful for Peter (and Morgan’s) help as farm sitters when we get away from the farm. There are lots of details to hold down here, even when we are away, like milking goats, feeding dogs, watering the greenhouse, harvesting zucchini (because those babies never stop!), etc. So it’s a huge gift to have someone stay here who can handle it all.

 Ryan and Morgan transplanting winter lettuce, photo by Adam Ford

Ryan and Morgan transplanting winter lettuce, photo by Adam Ford

It’s too early to know exactly where Peter will head in the future with all his developing farm skills, but it’s clear however he puts them all to use, whoever he shares his food with will simply be happier after interacting with him. Thanks for all your hard work, Peter!

 more Dr. Seuss on the farm, photo by Adam Ford

more Dr. Seuss on the farm, photo by Adam Ford


Have a great week!

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Peter, Morgan, Mikayla, Sam, and Taylor

Cornbread Stuffed Acorn Squash

 image from epicurious.com

image from epicurious.com

  • 2 acorn suqash, cut in half, seeds scooped out

  • 2 TBSP olive oi

  • 4-6 cloves of garlic, pressed

  • 1 carrot, finely choped

  • 1-2 small onions, finely chopped

  • 1 pint shiitakes, finely chopped (or 1 cup cooked sausage)

  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries

  • 1 tart apple, finely chopped

  • 1 bag spinach, finely chopped spinach

  • 2-3 corn muffins, cubed

  • 1 tsp thyme

  • 1 tsp sage

  • 1 tsp rosemary

  • salt and pepper

  • 2 eggs

Roast squash halves at 425 for about 35 minutes. Toast cubed muffin on a baking sheet at 425 for about 10-15 minutes. Saute garlic, onion, carrot, mushrooms (or sausage), and cranberries with olive oil for about 10 minutes. Add spinach, apples, salt, pepper, thyme, sage, rosemary, and corn muffin cubes. Remove from the heat and mix in the eggs. Stuff each squash piece with mixture. Bake at 425 for 20-25 minutes. Enjoy!