What’s Available

This week you can choose from red potatoes, yellow potatoes, fingerling potatoes, red beets, golden beets, baby arugula, mesclun mix, baby lettuce, baby kale, baby bok choi, pea shoots, spinach, microgreens, garlic, green tomatoes, husk cherries, red and green cabbage, napa cabbage, carrots, broccoli, green curly kale, red and yellow onions, spaghetti squash, butternut squash, acorn squash, delicata squash, sweet peppers, jalapenos, brussels sprouts, and leeks! 

 empty beet field after the bulk harvest, photo by Adam Ford

empty beet field after the bulk harvest, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Details (Including how to pickup in Ludlow)

You can pick up your summer share at the farm on Thursdays and Fridays from 8 am to 7 pm, from the Rutland Farmers’ Market on Saturdays from 9 am to 2pm, and Tygart Mountain Sports in Ludlow between 2pm and 5pm by filling out this form by 8am on Friday: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe3w7FWNKDd_KAj5-QLleXE_LjBNSn2GzUEW26VfYNdajZwhQ/viewform?c=0&w=1 If you come after 5pm your bag will be right outside the door to the store.

 little baby parsley plants growing to be harvested in the winter, photo by Adam Ford

little baby parsley plants growing to be harvested in the winter, photo by Adam Ford

CSA Reminders

Now is a great time to sign up for the fall share! https://www.eveningsongcsa.com/csa-fall-share . Also, if you aren’t on a payment plan, and you haven’t finished paying for your summer share, now is a great time to do so. Let me know if you need to know your balance. It’s easiest for us if you can finish paying before the fall share starts.

 this is what lettuce looks like after it’s cut for harvest, photo by Adam Ford

this is what lettuce looks like after it’s cut for harvest, photo by Adam Ford

Bulk Availability

Send me an email if you want any of the items below in bulk for preserving. These are wholesale prices we make available to CSA members and their friends a family.

  • garlic for $10 per pound

  • red or golden beets for $2 per pound

  • frozen elderberries are $60 for 10 pound bag

  • husk cherries for $6 per pound

  • red or green cabbage for $1.50 per pound

  • napa cabbage for $1 per pound

  • red or yellow potatoes for $1.75 per pound

  • fingerlings for $2.25 per pound

  • butternut or acorn squash for $1.20 per pound

  • delicata or spaghetti squash for $1.80 per pound

 winter kale transplanted in the tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

winter kale transplanted in the tunnel, photo by Adam Ford

Farm News

This week we started cracking garlic heads for planting, probably next week. I have been asked in the past what my favorite vegetable to grow is. Hands down, my favorite to plant, take care of, harvest, eat, and sell is garlic. I love garlic so much, I cannot imagine eating without copious amounts of it in most food. It’s such a nice crop to plant, because it reminds me of tucking flower bulbs into the ground when I was a kid, which was likely my first exposure to gardening. My earliest memories of planting something were these papery tulip bulbs that my mom laid out for me in a tiny 8 square foot garden in the corner of our New Jersey yard. I remember being blown away that I could tuck this weird thing in the ground, and not only would it know how to come back out of the ground, but it would change shape, and produce a beautiful flower. This is still how I feel about garlic. It’s tough for me to put something so delicious in the ground, but I love visualizing these little cloves sprouting their strong green sprout and sending up a strong stalk to photosynthesize and produce a great bulb under ground.

 Adults may be able to tell which is which, but Sky has a hard time differentiating whether the truck cab or the spray nozzle is a farm tool or toy…. photo by Adam Ford

Adults may be able to tell which is which, but Sky has a hard time differentiating whether the truck cab or the spray nozzle is a farm tool or toy…. photo by Adam Ford

For those of you who grow garlic, we plant our garlic 12 inches apart in each direction and keep it mulched through the season to manage weeds. Before the winter we throw row cover over the planting as well to give it a little extra protection.

 Mikayla dreaming about all the kimchi in her future as she and Morgan harvest napa cabbage, photo by Adam Ford

Mikayla dreaming about all the kimchi in her future as she and Morgan harvest napa cabbage, photo by Adam Ford

We also finished harvesting, washing, and storing this winter’s potatoes. Still to come for the bulk harvesting are carrots, cabbage, napa, rutabaga, Gilfeather, leeks, and bruseels sprouts. It has been so nice to have a much more manageable fall… we scaled back the volumes of all our winter storage vegetables, and the work load is way sweeter.

 bags of potatoes ready for the root cellar cooler, photo by Adam Ford

bags of potatoes ready for the root cellar cooler, photo by Adam Ford

On Thursday of this week, Ryan is presenting on high tunnel production of winter greens for a workshop hosted at our farm by the USDA and NOFA. You have heard me say it before, but I find Ryan to be a very clever farmer, so I think he will have a fair bit to offer the workshop here. There is a voluntary food safety program for small farms that was designed to help farms even smaller than us get interested in developing food safety plans. A small part of that program is attending continued education opportunities, and this is a workshop that other farmers can attend as part of that program offered by the USDA.

 spinach leaf, photo by Adam Ford

spinach leaf, photo by Adam Ford

There are only 2 more weeks of the outdoor Rutland Farmers’ Market before it moves inside for the winter. We love being outdoors for market, but as the weather changes, making it more unpleasant to stand outside all day, we are starting to feel excited to move indoors for the season. Even though we have had a couple nights of a patchy frost, tonight should be our first hard frost of the season… Much later than the last week of August we were told to plan for when we moved here 8 years ago.

 patchy frost on lettuce, photo by Adam Ford

patchy frost on lettuce, photo by Adam Ford

I love the lengthening summer weather personally, but I always shudder inside knowing that it is associated with the catastrophic climate change we are living through. Especially in light of this week’s UN release of the alarming reality that we only have 12 years as a civilization to get our priorities in order to hopefully survive the climate crisis. Reading the science on this crisis always have me thinking about what role our farm can play in the necessary shifts our culture needs to make. And then I am reminded that this is exactly why I farm. Climate action is what called me towards doing this work. We need to make small and medium farms, and regional production the new norm, as it always was before the industrial revolution. We know that the largest 100 corporations in the world are responsible for 70% of greenhouse gas emissions, but one of the ways we can shift that narrative is to start relying on smaller businesses to produce those goods and services in a more sustainable way. By being part of a CSA, you are inherently part of the solution. Here’s to the global community finding the political will to put profits aside and try to save the only planet we can live on. These are my thoughts and hopes as I grow this food each week.

 Milkweed, monarch food, photo by Adam Ford

Milkweed, monarch food, photo by Adam Ford

Have a great week!

-ESF Team: Kara, Ryan, Sam, Peter, Taylor, Mikayla, and Morgan

Acorn Squash Soup

 image from movementmenu.com

image from movementmenu.com

3 acorn squash, cut in half, seeds scooped out

1 head garlic (2 cloves crushed, the rest whole)

2 red or yellow onions

1 inch ginger root, grated

1/4 tsp salt

1/2 tsp tumeric

1 tsp cumin

1 tsp coriander

1/2 tsp paprika

1 can coconut milk

1/4 cup olive oil

water as needed

Remove 2 garlic cloves from the head, keep the rest of the head intact. On a baking sheet, place the acorn squash halves face down, with the garlic under one of the squashes. Bake at 400 until you can pierce the squash with a fork. Meanwhile, saute the garlic, onions, ginger, salt, tumeric, cumin, coriander, and paprika in the olive oil in a pot. Turn off when the onions are translucent. When the suqash is cooked, scoop the flesh out into the pot. Peel the roasted garlic, and add to the pot. Add the coconut milk and a splash of water. Blend the entire soup. Add water or more coconut milk to create your desired consistency. Enjoy!